ShareThis Page
Penguins

Penguins leave offense at home in overtime loss to Senators

Jonathan Bombulie
| Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, 9:57 p.m.

OTTAWA — Evgeni Malkin has a burning desire to score goals. It’s been a defining characteristic of his game for the past 12-plus seasons.

On Saturday night, it cost the Pittsburgh Penguins a point in the standings.

Malkin was guilty of a bad line change in overtime, and Ryan Dzingel converted on the ensuing power play, giving the Ottawa Senators a 2-1 victory.

The loss ended a modest two-game winning streak for the Penguins, who are 5-2-3 in their past 10. They’ve dropped four straight games decided after regulation: three in overtime and one in a shootout.

In the run-up to the penalty, Sidney Crosby corralled the puck in the defensive zone and held it as tired teammate Jake Guentzel made his way to the bench. Thinking he could jump on the ice, take a pass from Crosby and move in on a breakaway, Malkin turned overzealous and left the bench too soon.

“It’s my fault,” Malkin said. “I think I jumped a little bit early, but I see Sid has the puck. I tried to jump and have a breakaway. Probably I needed to wait one more second.”

On the power play that followed, Dzingel took a cross-ice pass from Mark Stone at the bottom of the right faceoff circle and wired a shot in under the crossbar.

“It’s frustrating because we don’t want to put ourselves in that position, and I know Geno doesn’t want to put us in that position,” coach Mike Sullivan said. “I think he’s anxious to get on the ice, but we’ve got to show a little bit more discipline there.”

Penalty trouble was a major problem for the Penguins in the game. From the 9-minute mark of the second period on, the Senators held a 5-1 advantage in power plays.

Whether that was a result of a lack of discipline by the Penguins or an uneven job of officiating done by referees Kevin Pollock and Furman South was a topic that was very much open to debate after the game.

Crosby was diplomatic.

“We did a lot of good things, but you can’t expect to win games, especially close games, putting yourself in that position time and time again,” he said.

Malkin was less so.

“Not just tonight. It’s like every game,” he said. “It’s crazy how many times we played on the PK. I think we played a better game. Forty minutes, we played in the offensive zone and they had five power plays and we had two. I don’t know. How many times high-stick against Sid? It’s a dangerous penalty.”

Penalties aside, the Penguins dominated possession throughout much of the game. They practically doubled up the Senators in shot attempts (85-43) and scoring chances (37-18) but could manage only a 1-1 tie in regulation.

Thomas Chabot scored for Ottawa in the first period on a shot from the blue line past an Olli Maatta screen.

Jean-Sebastien Dea, playing in his first game back with the Penguins after being reclaimed on waivers from the New Jersey Devils on Nov. 29, evened the score in the second period. He skated up the right wing past defenseman Ben Harpur and beat goalie Craig Anderson short side.

“It feels really good to get that first goal in the first game,” Dea said. “It gives me a lot of confidence moving forward.”

Otherwise, though, it was a frustrating offensive night for the Penguins, who lost in Ottawa for the second time in three weeks.

“I thought we dominated a lot of the game,” Sullivan said. “We couldn’t find a way to score more goals. There was a lot to like about our effort tonight.”

Jonathan Bombulie is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Jonathan at jbombulie@tribweb.com or via Twitter @BombulieTrib.

Senators defenseman Justin Falk tries to maintain control of the puck as the Penguins’ Bryan Rust (17) and Zach Aston-Reese (46) try for the puck during the first period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Senators defenseman Justin Falk tries to maintain control of the puck as the Penguins’ Bryan Rust (17) and Zach Aston-Reese (46) try for the puck during the first period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Penguins defenseman Brian Dumoulin (8) looks back toward goalie Casey DeSmith, who blocks a Senators shot during the second period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Penguins defenseman Brian Dumoulin (8) looks back toward goalie Casey DeSmith, who blocks a Senators shot during the second period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Penguins defenseman Kris Letang and Senators left wing Ryan Dzingel vie for the puck during the second period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Penguins defenseman Kris Letang and Senators left wing Ryan Dzingel vie for the puck during the second period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Senators defenseman Cody Ceci keeps his eyes on Penguins center Sidney Crosby, who skates with the puck alongside Jake Guentzel during the first period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
Senators defenseman Cody Ceci keeps his eyes on Penguins center Sidney Crosby, who skates with the puck alongside Jake Guentzel during the first period Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018, in Ottawa, Ontario.
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me