Penn State safety Lamont Wade looking for big season | TribLIVE.com
Penn State

Penn State safety Lamont Wade looking for big season

Paul Schofield
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s Lamont Wade talks at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Beaver Stadium in University Park.
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s Nick Bowers talks at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Beaver Stadium in University Park.
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s Lamont Wade talks at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Beaver Stadium in University Park.
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s Beaver Stadium at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019.
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s Sean Clifford talks at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Beaver Stadium in University Park.
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Paul Schofield | Tribune-Review
Penn State’s C.J. Thorpe talks at media day Saturday, Aug. 3, 2019 at Beaver Stadium in University Park.

UNIVERSITY PARK — Penn State junior safety Lamont Wade seriously thought about transferring in the spring.

He entered the NCAA transfer portal while he figured things out. One thing that bothered Wade was not spending more time with his son, who was born in 2018.

Wade, a five-star recruit from Clairton, decided to stay, and he’s drawing rave reviews from coach James Franklin, defensive coordinator Brent Pry and safety coach Tim Banks.

“Lamont is playing his best football,” Pry said Saturday during Penn State’s media day at Beaver Stadium. “I’m really proud how he’s worked. With him and Jaquan Brisker (Gateway), I see the position becoming a strength.”

Franklin does, too.

“The secondary has a chance to be good,” Franklin said. “We have a lot of players who could make an impact. There are a lot of position battles.”

Even though he looked at other schools, Wade continued to work hard while he figured things out.

“I decided to stay because it was my best opportunity to play here,” Wade said. “It was all about what I did and how I handle things. The coaches were up front with me.

“At the end of the day, we’re headed in the right direction as a program. My son was a reason I looked, but sometimes you have to make sacrifices.”

Wade said the spring went well, and he has welcomed friend Brisker — a top junior college recruit — to the team. Though the WPIAL pair — Brisker, at 6-foot-1, having more length than the 5-9 Wade — are competing for playing time at the same position, Wade is helping his new teammate adjust.

Wade, a 2017 Clairton grad, said the biggest difference in his game is his maturity.

“I’m 100 times more mature than I was when I walked in the door,” he said. “Things have changed. I’m a better player, and I’m a better man. I figured stuff out on my own. The clock is ticking. I’m not worried about things. I just keep working. I’m better mentally and physically, and it’s going to show.”

Two other WPIAL players who hope to play key roles for the Nittany Lions are senior tight end Nick Bowers (Kittanning) and sophomore offensive lineman C.J. Thorpe (Central Catholic).

Bowers has had an injury-plagued career at Penn State, but he was singled out by Franklin on Saturday.

“I believe Nick will have a huge year,” Franklin said.

Bowers appeared in 12 games the past two seasons and is looking forward to contributing more this season.

“I grew up all my life playing football,” Bowers said. “It was my dream to football at Penn State, and I want to continue trying. I’m pretty excited, looking forward to camp and taking advantage of my opportunities.”

Note: Penn State senior safety John Petrishen announced Friday he has entered the NCAA transfer portal. The 2015 Central Catholic graduate and Lower Burrell resident appeared in three games in 2017 and 13 games in ‘18, mainly on special teams.

Paul Schofield is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Paul by email at [email protected] or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | Penn State
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