Podcast part 3: Faced with adversity, Chris Long ‘stuck it out’ to become All-American at Virginia | TribLIVE.com
NFL

Podcast part 3: Faced with adversity, Chris Long ‘stuck it out’ to become All-American at Virginia

Former NFL standout Chris Long discusses his college days at Virginia, where he says almost transferred, in Part 3 of this week’s “Huddle Up with Gus” podcast.

Long, son of Pro Football Hall of Famer Howie Long, went on to win back-to-back Super Bowls with the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles after having played his first eight years with the St. Louis Rams.

But he said his college playing days under then-coach Al Groh came with plenty of adversity, including switching positions and learning complicated schemes.

“I thought I was struggling. I was out of scheme. I was learning a new thing. Frankly, it was just really hard,” he told podcast host Gus Frerotte and partner Dave Hager. “My sophomore year, I think it was, I looked at some other schools, and I was on the cusp.

“It was all scheme-driven for me. … (The scheme) is stunting my development, and honestly I’m not having fun.

“I was really glad I stuck it out. My junior year, spring game, I came out and kind of set it on fire a little bit. … I started to feel good. From there, I felt a lot better about it.

“Being on the cusp of quitting or doing something else taught me a lot.”

Long went on to be named a first-team All-American and won the Hendricks Award, given annually to the best defensive end in the country.

Long also discusses the difference between ACC and SEC football atmospheres and meeting his wife in college.

•••

Part 1: ‘Huddle Up:’ Ex-NFL great Chris Long retires to parents’ home – for now

Part 2: Podcast part 2: Chris Long recalls ‘shenanigans’ as a kid, college recruiting

•••

Coming Thursday: Part 4 with Chris Long


1335523_web1_gtr-GusPodcast3-062519
AP
Virginia defensive end Chris Long center is joined by his father, Howie, right, and mother, Diane, left, as the seniors are introduced prior to the Virginia Tech-Virginia college football game at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Nov. 24, 2007. The school retired his jersey. (AP Photo/Steve Helber) Virginia defensive end Chris Long center is joined by his father, Howie, right, and mother, Diane, left, as the seniors are introduced prior to the Virginia Tech-Virginia college football game at Scott Stadium in Charlottesville, Va., Saturday, Nov. 24, 2007. The school retired his jersey.
Categories: Local | Sports | NFL | Top Stories
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.