Raiders rally, then hold on to defeat Chargers in Oakland | TribLIVE.com
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Raiders rally, then hold on to defeat Chargers in Oakland

Associated Press
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AP
Oakland Raiders running back Josh Jacobs (28) runs against Los Angeles Chargers defensive tackle Jerry Tillery (99) during the first half of an NFL football game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019.
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AP
Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Philip Rivers (17) passes against the Oakland Raiders during the first half of an NFL football game in Oakland, Calif., Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019.

OAKLAND, Calif. — Josh Jacobs scored on an 18-yard run with 1 minute, 2 seconds remaining, and the Oakland Raiders had a late winning touchdown drive for the second time in five weeks, beating the Los Angeles Chargers, 26-24, on Thursday night.

Derek Carr led the Raiders (5-4) down the field methodically 75 yards after Philip Rivers threw a 6-yard pass to Austin Ekeler that gave the Chargers (4-6) a 24-20 lead with 4:02 remaining.

Carr completed three passes to Jalen Richard and two to Hunter Renfrow before Jacobs finished the drive with his seventh touchdown of his rookie season.

The victory didn’t come easy as Daniel Carlson missed the extra point, putting more pressure on the tired Raiders defense to stop Rivers. Trayvon Mullen was called for holding on a fourth-down pass to extend the drive, but Karl Joseph then intercepted a fourth-down pass from Rivers to seal it.

Joseph also had the game-sealing pass breakup Sunday against the Detroit Lions after Carr threw a TD pass to Renfrow in a 31-24 victory.

Categories: Sports | NFL
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