ShareThis Page
Reveal shows off Pitt’s new school colors and Panther head logo | TribLIVE.com
Pitt

Reveal shows off Pitt’s new school colors and Panther head logo

Kevin Gorman
992320_web1_gtr-pitt02-040819
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Reveal of Pitt’s new uniforms and colors during an event on Bigelow Boulevard between the Cathedral of Learning and the William Pitt Union Sunday, April 7, 2019 in Oakland.
992320_web1_gtr-pitt03-040819
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Reveal of Pitt’s new uniforms and colors during an event on Bigelow Boulevard between the Cathedral of Learning and the William Pitt Union Sunday, April 7, 2019 in Oakland.
992320_web1_gtr-pitt04-040819
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Reveal of Pitt’s new uniforms and colors during an event on Bigelow Boulevard between the Cathedral of Learning and the William Pitt Union Sunday, April 7, 2019 in Oakland.
992320_web1_gtr-pitt01-040819
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
The Reveal of Pitt’s new uniforms and colors during an event on Bigelow Boulevard between the Cathedral of Learning and the William Pitt Union Sunday, April 7, 2019 in Oakland.

Pitt revealed a new color scheme and secondary logo on Sunday in a celebration on its Oakland campus, returning to its royal blue and gold roots and introducing a Panther head logo that will be worn on the uniforms of all of its athletic teams.

The university also held a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Nike Store at The Pitt Shop on Forbes Avenue with Pitt athletic director Heather Lyke and members of the Nike creative team that came up with the redesign, which restores the Pitt script as the primary logo but also unveiled a new Panthers script on shirts.

Pitt had worn the royal blue and gold colors donned by its 1976 national championship football team in games the past few seasons as a retro alternative to their primary navy blue and gold, which Lyke said too closely resembled fellow ACC schools such as Georgia Tech and Notre Dame and will be discontinued.

“It’s essential and it’s critical to who we are,” Lyke said. “I think there’s a sense of pride in these colors. Kids want to wear retro on a big game because it matters. You look good, you play good. There’s something to that. I also felt it unifies our campus, unifies our alumni base and unifies the students. It’s what people like. Instead of people saying, ‘What are we going to wear today?’ This is the answer. That was to create an identity that will stand the test of time. We believe that we are there.”

The revelation was the culmination of a two-year process in collaboration with the Nike Global Identity Group, which came up with designs for the new color scheme, logos, typeface and jersey numbers.

The importance of the Cathedral of Learning on Pitt’s campus is reflected in the designs, as the Nike design team spent several days on campus for inspiration. The cathedral’s Gothic arches are apparent in the numbers and inversed on the chin of the Panther logo, which was based on the Panther head on the fountain at the entrance of the cathedral.

“We knew immediately that was something we wanted to incorporate,” said Nike art director Sean Butterly. “It’s the perfect cover to the book to tell the story.”

Get the latest news about Pitt football and all things Panthers athletics

Kevin Gorman is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Kevin by email at kgorman@tribweb.com or via Twitter .

Categories: Sports | Pitt
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.