Shane Lowry wins British Open in celebrated return to Emerald Isle | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Shane Lowry wins British Open in celebrated return to Emerald Isle

Associated Press
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AP
Ireland’s Shane Lowry lifts his club to celebrate as he wins the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.
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Ireland’s Shane Lowry reacts after making a birdie on the 15th green during the final round of the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.
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Ireland’s Shane Lowry plays his tee shot at the 5th hole during the final round of the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.
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Ireland’s Shane Lowry reacts after making a birdie on the 15th green during the final round of the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.
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England’s Tommy Fleetwood plays from the rough on the 7th hole during the final round of the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.
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Brooks Koepka of the United States walks onto the 10th green as he shelters from the heavy rain under an umbrella during the final round of the British Open Golf Championships at Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland, Sunday, July 21, 2019.

PORTRUSH, Northern Ireland — The outcome never was in doubt to about anyone but Shane Lowry.

A year ago, he sat in the parking lot at Carnoustie and cried after missing the cut in the British Open for the fourth straight year. Even with a four-shot lead Sunday at Royal Portrush, in a raging wind and pouring rain, Lowry kept telling his caddie he was nervous and scared, worried he would ruin a storybook ending to the first Open in Northern Ireland in 68 years.

“I suppose I didn’t even know going out this morning if I was good enough to win a major,” Lowry said. “And look, I’m here now, a major champion. I can’t believe I’m saying it, to be honest.”

The 32-year-old Irishman marks his golf ball with a green shamrock. This had nothing to do with luck.

With stout nerves and a soft touch around the greens, Lowry gave a sellout crowd what they wanted to see. He endured the worst weather of the week, held up under Sunday pressure and expectations of fans who cheered his every step, and won the British Open by six shots.

All he could think about was that walk up the final hole, and it was everything he imagined.

Even as the rain stopped, the tears began flowing.

“I can’t believe this is me standing here,” Lowry said has he cradled the silver claret jug. “I can’t believe this is mine.”

Lowry closed with a 1-over-par 72, the first time since 1996 the Open champion was over par in the final round, and it was no less impressive. More difficult than the rain was wind strong enough to break an umbrella. Lowry made four bogeys in the toughest stretch of Royal Portrush without losing ground.

No one from the last 12 groups broke par. No one got closer than three shots of Lowry all day.

“It was Shane’s time, Shane’s tournament,” said Tommy Fleetwood, who closed with a 74 to finish runner-up for the second time in a major.

Thousands of fans who filled these links off the North Atlantic began to celebrate when Lowry rolled in an 8-foot birdie putt on the 15th hole to stretch his lead to six with three holes to play.

His smile got wider with every hole coming in. The cheers got louder.

When his approach to the 18th was just on the fringe, he stretched out his arms and hugged caddie Bo Martin, whom Lowry had leaned on with brutal honesty.

“He was great at keeping me in the moment,” Lowry said. “I kept telling him how nervous I was, how scared I was, how much I didn’t want to mess it up. All I could think about was walking down 18 with a four- or five-shot lead, and lucky I got to do that.”

The loudest roar of a raucous week was for a tap-in par that made Lowry a major champion.

“He’s done brilliantly,” Lee Westwood said after grinding out a 73 to tie for fourth. “All the chasers would have wanted tough conditions, and he’s clearly played brilliantly to be on the score he has, under the pressure he’s under.”

Fleetwood, the only player who kept Lowry in range, had chances early to put more pressure on him. He missed a 10-foot birdie putt on the opening hole when Lowry still had work left for bogey. Fleetwood missed a 5-foot par putt on the third, and his hopes ended from a bunker and the rough that led to double bogey on the 14th.

“I never really got close enough, and Shane played great,” Fleetwood said.

Tony Finau shot 71 to finish alone in third, though he was never closer than seven shots. Brooks Koepka, going for his fourth major in the last seven, began the final round seven shots behind and opened with four straight bogeys. He shot 74 and tied for fourth.

Lowry finished at 15-under 269 and earned $1.935 million.

“I didn’t feel great out there. It was probably the most uncomfortable I’ve ever felt on a golf course,” Lowry said. “You’re out there trying to win an Open in your home country, and it’s just incredibly difficult.”

He shared his greatest moment with his family who paved the way, the players who inspired and encouraged him through the lows. And after he was introduced as “champion golfer of the year,” he shared it with thousands of people he didn’t even know, all of them crammed along the hillocks and swales, along the edge of the ocean, and who sat in the horseshoe-shaped grandstands on the 18th under umbrellas waiting for the Irishman to arrive.

Holding up the claret jug, Lowry said to them, “This one’s for you.”

Categories: Sports | US-World
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