Slow start dooms top-seeded Penn State lacrosse in NCAA semifinal loss | TribLIVE.com
Penn State

Slow start dooms top-seeded Penn State lacrosse in NCAA semifinal loss

1211288_web1_1211288-de18cced602347759fd6bfabff51d104
AP
Penn State’s Kevin Fox (31) defends against Yale’s Jack Tigh (18) during a semifinal game in the NCAA Division I men’s lacrosse tournament at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 25, 2019. (Tim Tai/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)
1211288_web1_1211288-e69f97b918ed4f2d8253a9fd55430c1e
AP
Penn State’s Brayden Peck (44) embraces teammate Bobby Burns (4) after the defeated Penn State 21-17 in a semifinal game in the NCAA Division I men’s lacrosse tournament at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, Saturday, May 25, 2019. (Tim Tai/The Philadelphia Inquirer via AP)

Freshman Matt Brandau scored a career-high seven goals, and Yale held on to defeat top-seeded Penn State, 21-17, in the NCAA Division I semifinals on Saturday at Philadelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field.

Yale jumped to a 10-1 lead in the first quarter — tying an NCAA semifinal record for most goals in a quarter — and advanced to play Virginia (16-3) in Monday’s final. Penn State finishes its season at 16-2, with both losses coming to Yale (15-3).

Penn State junior Grant Ament finished with three goals and five assists, giving him an NCAA Tournament-record 18 assists. Junior Dylan Foulds added a career-high five goals, and junior Mac O’Keefe had three goals for the Nittany Lions.

Penn State rallied to cut the deficit to 12-9 at halftime and 16-13 after three quarters, but Yale scored the first four goals of the fourth quarter to seal the win.

Categories: Sports | Penn State
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.