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Steelers

Steelers notebook: Todd Haley mum on use of no-huddle

Chris Adamski
| Thursday, Nov. 9, 2017, 6:47 p.m.
Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger talk during practice Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, at St. Vincent.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers offensive coordinator Todd Haley and quarterback Ben Roethlisberger talk during practice Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017, at St. Vincent.
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger talks with offensive coordinator Todd Haley after throwing his fifth interception against the Jaguars Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, at Heinz Field.
Christopher Horner | Tribune-Review
Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger talks with offensive coordinator Todd Haley after throwing his fifth interception against the Jaguars Sunday, Oct. 8, 2017, at Heinz Field.

On Wednesday, Ben Roethlisberger was asked what role the no-huddle held in the Steelers' offense.

“I don't know,” the Steelers' quarterback said. “That's up to Todd.”

Todd, of course, is offensive coordinator Todd Haley.

So on Thursday, Haley was asked what dictates the Steelers' usage of the no-huddle. His answer was vague.

“We are a gameplan team. Each week is a new week for us,” Haley said. “Obviously we have our language that we speak, our terminology we have, a library of plays that we work going all the way back to the spring. But each week we sit down, and we gameplan against the defense we are playing, so a lot of factors go into making all those decisions — not just no-huddle but what runs we are going to run, what passes we run, what play actions and then situational football.”

In their most recent game Oct. 29 at Detroit, the Steelers ran the no-huddle only twice — once during the final 2 minutes of the first half, when it was necessitated by situation.

According to NFLsavant.com, the Steelers rank among the top five in plays run out of the no-huddle (82).

But they have run it only five times over the past three games; just twice outside of the two-minute warning of a half. The Steelers ran the no-huddle 47 times in the three games prior to that three-game stretch.

Mitchell remains limited

Safety Mike Mitchell remained the only starter on the Steelers' injury report. He was limited in practice because of an Achilles injury for the second consecutive day Thursday.

If Mitchell can't play Sunday at Indianapolis, veteran Robert Golden likely would start at free safety with J.J. Wilcox also part of the mix.

“Me and Rob G work well — and J.J. too; even though he is new, J.J. is a contributor as well,” starting strong safety Sean Davis said. “We are always talking and on the same page. So I feel like all four of us safeties all have a good understanding for each other and communicate well and play well with each other.”

The other player on the Steelers' injury report — veteran linebacker James Harrison — did not practice for the second consecutive day because of a back injury.

Colts' Hilton added to list

Arguably the Colts' best active player was added to their injury report Thursday. Receiver T.Y. Hilton was limited in practice because of a groin injury.

He trails only Antonio Brown among NFL leaders in receiving yards, and his 20.6-yard average ranks second.

The Colts officially will be without defensive tackle Henry Anderson on Sunday; Anderson was placed on season-ending injured reserve. The Steelers also won't face veteran cornerback Vontae Davis. The Colts released him after benching him last week and Davis complaining to the media about it Wednesday.

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

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