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Steelers' William Gay joins Joe Biden's foundation, speaks on domestic violence

Chris Adamski
| Friday, Feb. 9, 2018, 1:15 p.m.
Steelers cornerback William Gay takes the field against the  Browns at FirstEnergy Stadium 2017.
Chaz Palla | Tribune-Review
Steelers cornerback William Gay takes the field against the Browns at FirstEnergy Stadium 2017.

Veteran Steelers cornerback William Gay was invited by Joe Biden to join the advisory council for the former vice president's foundation.

According to a story published on the ESPN website The Undefeated , Gay accepted an invitation to join a prominent group of leaders, experts and advocates who have been selected to serve as ambassadors for the Biden Foundation, guiding strategic partnerships to create societal change.

Gay's role will be focused on ending sexual assault and violence against women, among other causes. The 33-year-old, 11-year NFL veteran lost his mother to murder by her boyfriend when Gay was 8 years old.

"I received a letter, and when I saw 'Joe Biden' on it, I'm like, 'OK, this might be a false letter,' " Gay told The Undefeated. "But then my agent told me about it and then the NFL also told me about, so then I was like, 'OK, it's real.' His ideas are similar to what I have going on, what my beliefs are, and trying to end domestic violence. I was glad he thought of me. I jumped at the opportunity — not as quick as I wanted to, because I got the invite during the season and I'm 100 percent about football. So I tried to focus in on the playoffs, but I was all excited for the opportunity to be invited on the advisory committee."

Gay and Biden were scheduled to speak Friday at the Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values Central 2018 in Indianapolis. The former Super Bowl champion and former vice president were to talk about their commitment to empowering men and women alike to stop sexual assault on college campuses.

"What drives me is my mother's story," Gay said. "And this is a way, one, to keep her voice alive; two, just to help someone who is either in their situation or as a child in the same situation, give that encouragement that there are better things out there in the world. As a kid, there's no like, 'Oh, my God, my life is over because I don't have parents.' And for anyone who is in that violent situation or the sexual assault situation, there are people out there who would help. I don't think my mom knew people that would help, because this was back in 1992. This is my way of allowing her story to stay alive, her to be alive, and also her story helps someone else."

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

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