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Penn State alum, Giants rookie Saquon Barkley leads NFL jersey sales 'by a wide margin'

Chris Adamski
| Thursday, July 19, 2018, 3:24 p.m.
Running back Saquon Barkley of the Penn State Nittany Lions reacts on the field after defeating the Washington Huskies 35-28 in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium on Dec. 30, 2017 in Glendale, Arizona. The Nittany Lions won 35-28.
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Running back Saquon Barkley of the Penn State Nittany Lions reacts on the field after defeating the Washington Huskies 35-28 in the PlayStation Fiesta Bowl at University of Phoenix Stadium on Dec. 30, 2017 in Glendale, Arizona. The Nittany Lions won 35-28.

Saquon Barkley hasn’t even so much yet partaken in an NFL training camp practice. But the former Penn State running back already leads the league in one category.

There were more of Barkley’s New York Giants jerseys sold in the three-month span from March 1-May 31 than any other player in the league “by a wide margin,” according to data released Thursday by the NFL Players Association.

Barkey was the only rookie in the top 10 of jersey sales, and was the only non-quarterback in the top seven.

In terms of all licensed merchandise – including bobbleheads, youth apparel, socks, Fathead wall decals, pet products, collectibles, cake decorations and more – Barkley ranks fourth in sales over the spring months, trailing quarterbacks Nick Foles, Tom Brady and Carson Wentz.

The highest-rated Steelers player in merchandise sales from March through May was receiver Antonio Brown at 11 th . Quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (29 th ) and receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster (44 th ) were other Steelers in the top 50.

Seven of the top 50 represented the reigning Super Bowl champion Philadelphia Eagles, including quarterbacks Foles and Wentz.

New England Patriots quarterback Brady is the reigning league MVP – and also the most valuable likeness for niche items. Brady led all players in sales of officially-licensed youth jerseys, socks, headwear, per accessories, cornhole boards, Fathead wall decals and “Masterpiece” puzzles.

Brown was second in licensed sock sales and sixth in youth jersey sales.

Chris Adamski is a Tribune-Review staff writer. You can contact Chris at cadamski@tribweb.com or via Twitter @C_AdamskiTrib.

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