Tuukka Rask’s roll has Bruins a win away from Stanley Cup Final | TribLIVE.com
NHL

Tuukka Rask’s roll has Bruins a win away from Stanley Cup Final

Associated Press
1164383_web1_1164383-ec1a1d4a47b74f168aec614b61d3a498
Bruins goaltender Tuukka Rask looks for the puck after a save as the Hurricanes’ Justin Williams tries to knock in the rebound during the first period in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference finals on Thursday, May 9, 2019, in Boston.

RALEIGH, N.C. — Tuukka Rask is stopping just about any puck playoff opponents can shoot his way — even the ones he doesn’t see.

The goaltender has been dominant in the Boston Bruins’ six-game postseason winning streak that has them on the doorstep of the Stanley Cup Final. Just don’t expect him to make any grand declaration of being “in the zone” as he makes stop after stop in these playoffs.

He’s confident and comfortable. Leave it at that.

“I’ve felt good for many, many months,” Rask said. “It’s just the way when you’re seeing the puck, when you feel comfortable. It’s about timing and patience and all that. I think experience helps that. … The way I usually want to play, I want to play calm and make myself look big and maybe even tough chances, try to make it look easy kind of.

“So if that’s in the zone, then so be it. But I just try to be focused and give us a chance.”

That’s exactly what Rask has been doing in helping the Bruins to a 3-0 lead on the Carolina Hurricanes in the Eastern Conference finals. Boston goes for the sweep Thursday night in Raleigh.

The 32-year-old Finnish netminder has stopped 85 of 90 shots in the first three games of the series with the Hurricanes, who have been unable to solve Rask even when getting a handful of open-net chances. He’s allowed nine goals on 205 shots in the six-game streak, good for a .956 save percentage and a 1.5 goals-against average.

Overall, he is second in the playoffs in save percentage (.939) and goals-against average (1.96) while posting a playoff-best 11 victories in 16 games.

“He looks super calm right now,” said Carolina defenseman Dougie Hamilton, who spent three seasons as Rask’s teammate with the Bruins. “We have to do a better job of getting in his face and making it harder on him. I mean, if he’s going to see it, he’s going to stop it, so we’ve got to get some sloppy stuff around the net.”

Yet it didn’t matter what the Hurricanes did Tuesday night in an all-out attack on Rask to start the game. They couldn’t zip or slip one by him.

Rask stopped 20 first-period shots and ensured the Bruins went into the first intermission in a scoreless game despite the Hurricanes carrying play in front of a rowdy crowd that helped Carolina go 5-0 at home in the postseason to that point.

That included one sequence roughly three minutes in when Rask stopped Nino Niederreiter’s tip, Micheal Ferland’s putback at the crease and Justin Williams’ follow-up try despite Rask losing his stick. There was another Williams rebound that wasn’t officially counted as a shot on goal, too. It was a harrowing few seconds for Boston coach Bruce Cassidy, who quipped: “I might have had my eyes closed for three of them.”

“He’s been dialed in” since the start of the playoffs, Cassidy said. “He’s been excellent. He really hasn’t had a poor night. He’s had a couple that were, I’d say, above average and the rest have been very good. Tonight the first period was excellent.”

That gave the Bruins a chance to regroup, then come out and score twice in the second period to take control.

Categories: Sports | NHL
TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.