Virginia overcomes Purdue in OT thriller, reaches Final Four | TribLIVE.com
U.S./World Sports

Virginia overcomes Purdue in OT thriller, reaches Final Four

Associated Press
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AP
Virginia’s Jack Salt (33) celebrates with teammates Mamadi Diakite and Ty Jerome (11) as Purdue’s Matt Haarms (32) watches after Diakite hit a shot to send the game to overtime in the NCAA Tournament on Saturday, March 30, 2019, in Louisville, Ky.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — From embarrassment to exhilaration. From early exit to regional champ. From bracket busters to net cutters.

Virginia, the first No. 1 seed to lose to a 16 seed a year ago, survived overtime and Carson Edwards’ staggering 3-point show Saturday night to make it to the Final Four for the first time since 1984.

The top-seeded Cavaliers needed a last-ditch buzzer-beater to send the game in overtime, then finally contained Edwards in the extra period to hang on for an 80-75 victory over Purdue in the South Region final.

The Cavaliers (33-3) redeemed themselves from last year’s loss to UMBC by relying on veterans, sound defense, poise, controlling the ball and a failure to be rattled even when the Boilermakers had the chance to ice the game in regulation at the foul line.

Their balance and experience allowed them to overcome a brilliant performance by Edwards, whose 10 3-pointers were one shy of the NCAA Tournament record. Edwards finished with 42 points for third-seeded Purdue (26-10), and none of his teammates scored more than seven each.

Edwards was named the Most Outstanding Player of the South regional, becoming the first player to win the honor from a losing team since Stephen Curry in 2008. Fitting, too, since Edwards scored the most points (139) through four NCAA Tournament game since 2000. Curry had the previous most with 128 points for Davidson.

De’Andre Hunter scored four points in overtime, including the go-ahead layup with 29 seconds remaining, and Kyle Guy and Kihei Clark each added two free throws as Virginia finally shook loose from Purdue.

Virginia got a last-gasp jumper from Mamadi Diakite’s as time expired to force overtime, and the Cavaliers got clutch baskets from Ty Jerome and Hunter, who also had two free throws, before Guy and Clark sealed the victory.

Guy injured his ankle in the first half, and his return was uncertain. But he came out from the break and hit back-to-back 3s and finished with 25 points — 21 after halftime — and 10 rebounds. Jerome had 24, Diakite 14 and Hunter 10 as the Cavaliers outlasted the high-scoring Boilermakers.

Edwards had been unstoppable until overtime, and although he connected on a jumper, he missed a late 3 and committed a turnover that ultimately led to Clark’s game-sealing foul shots.

The win put coach Tony Bennett in the Final Four for the first time in a decade with the Cavaliers. His father, Dick Bennett, coached Wisconsin to the Final Four in 2000 — beating Purdue in the regional finals.

Categories: Sports | US-World
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