ShareThis Page
Pennsylvania

Lou Barletta to seek Senate seat held by Bob Casey

| Monday, July 31, 2017, 2:00 p.m.
In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, left, R-Pa., U.S. Rep. Tom Marino, center left, R-Pa., and U.S. Rep. Scott Perry, right, R-Pa., watch as President-elect Donald Trump, center right, departs a rally in Hershey.
In this Dec. 15, 2016, file photo, U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, left, R-Pa., U.S. Rep. Tom Marino, center left, R-Pa., and U.S. Rep. Scott Perry, right, R-Pa., watch as President-elect Donald Trump, center right, departs a rally in Hershey.

HARRISBURG — Republican U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta, who was elected as a crusader against illegal immigration and helped cheerlead Donald Trump to victory last year, has told GOP officials and activists that he has decided to run for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Democrat Bob Casey.

A person familiar with the discussions told The Associated Press that Barletta began telling party officials of his decision last week, several months after he began considering it. The person spoke on condition of anonymity Monday because Barletta has not yet made his plans public.

In a text message Monday, Barletta said that his conversations have been “very positive” and that he will announce his decision in a few weeks.

“Continuing to go through process. Been talking to a lot of people,” Barletta wrote.

Barletta, 61, is in his fourth term representing a House district that stretches from south-central Pennsylvania's rolling farms through northeastern Pennsylvania's anthracite coal fields.

Barletta, a staunch Trump supporter in Congress, would quickly become the most recognizable name in a field of a half-dozen would-be challengers to Casey, the 57-year-old son of a late ex-governor and a fierce critic of the Republican president.

Barletta has supported Trump-backed legislation to overhaul the American health care system and introduced a bill to fund the construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border to help Trump fulfill a key campaign promise.

Barletta won his House seat during the Republican midterm wave of 2010, catapulted by the attention he received while mayor of the small city of Hazleton for cracking down on immigrants in the country illegally.

Hazleton approved Barletta's measures in 2006, denying permits to businesses that hire people in the country illegally and fining landlords who rent to them, but they were never enforced before the U.S. Supreme Court struck them down in 2014. Barletta's strategy was copied by dozens of other cities across the U.S. that accused the federal government of failing to enforce immigration laws.

Barletta endorsed Trump in the weeks leading up to Pennsylvania's presidential primary last year. He became a co-chairman of Trump's ultimately successful campaign in the state and served on Trump's transition team.

Casey plans to seek a third six-year term in next year's election. Democrats' 4-3 ratio registration edge over Republicans gives him a built-in advantage, though that did not stop Trump from becoming the first Republican since 1988 to capture Pennsylvania's crucial electoral votes in the presidential race.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me