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Pennsylvania

Ex-township official, girlfriend accused of abusing unconscious woman

| Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018, 1:00 p.m.
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Lawrence Weinstein, former Pennsylvania township official, (left) and his girlfriend, Kelly Drucker.
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Lawrence Weinstein, former Pennsylvania township official, (left) and his girlfriend, Kelly Drucker.
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Lawrence Weinstein, in Pa. Prosecutors say Weinstein, a former Pennsylvania township official, and his girlfriend, Kelly Drucker, spiked a woman’s drink and used a hidden camera to take sexually explicit photographs of her while she was unconscious. Weinstein and Drucker are charged with false imprisonment, invasion of privacy, recklessly endangering another person, criminal conspiracy and violations of the Pennsylvania Wiretap Act. They surrendered to Bucks County detectives Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. (Bucks County District Attorney’s Office via AP)
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Lawrence Weinstein, in Pa. Prosecutors say Weinstein, a former Pennsylvania township official, and his girlfriend, Kelly Drucker, spiked a woman’s drink and used a hidden camera to take sexually explicit photographs of her while she was unconscious. Weinstein and Drucker are charged with false imprisonment, invasion of privacy, recklessly endangering another person, criminal conspiracy and violations of the Pennsylvania Wiretap Act. They surrendered to Bucks County detectives Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. (Bucks County District Attorney’s Office via AP)
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Kelly Drucker in Pa. Prosecutors say Lawrence Weinstein, a former Pennsylvania township official, and his girlfriend, Drucker, spiked a woman’s drink and used a hidden camera to take sexually explicit photographs of her while she was unconscious. Weinstein and Drucker are charged with false imprisonment, invasion of privacy, recklessly endangering another person, criminal conspiracy and violations of the Pennsylvania Wiretap Act. They surrendered to Bucks County detectives Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. (Bucks County District Attorney’s Office via AP)
This undated photo released by the Bucks County (Pa.) District Attorney’s Office shows Kelly Drucker in Pa. Prosecutors say Lawrence Weinstein, a former Pennsylvania township official, and his girlfriend, Drucker, spiked a woman’s drink and used a hidden camera to take sexually explicit photographs of her while she was unconscious. Weinstein and Drucker are charged with false imprisonment, invasion of privacy, recklessly endangering another person, criminal conspiracy and violations of the Pennsylvania Wiretap Act. They surrendered to Bucks County detectives Tuesday, Oct. 9, 2018. (Bucks County District Attorney’s Office via AP)

DOYLESTOWN, Pa. — A former Pennsylvania township official and his girlfriend spiked a woman’s drink and used a hidden camera to take sexually explicit photographs of her while she was unconscious, according to police and prosecutors.

Lawrence Weinstein and Kelly Drucker are charged with false imprisonment, invasion of privacy, recklessly endangering another person, criminal conspiracy and violations of the Pennsylvania Wiretap Act. They surrendered to Bucks County detectives Tuesday.

Weinstein, 44, is a lawyer who resigned from his position as a Northampton Township Supervisor last month, citing “personal reasons.”

The plot came to light after 45-year-old Drucker’s ex-husband noticed his teenage daughter had been given her mom’s old phone, The Philadelphia Inquirer report ed. On it, he discovered text messages between Drucker and her boyfriend Weinstein detailing the plan hatched last October and alerted authorities.

In the texts, the couple talked about setting up a camera in a bathroom at Drucker’s home, as well as a hidden camera mounted in a pair of glasses.

Through the texts, shown in the affidavit, the two formulated a plan to bring the victim, who worked for Northampton Township, back to Drucker’s house after under the pretense of celebrating what a good job she was doing at work.

Over the course of several hours, authorities said, Weinstein coached Drucker in their “mission,” as he described it in the texts, urging her to serve the victim drinks of “1/2 everclear and 1/2 wine” and to encourage her to spend the night at the home.

When the victim went to use bathroom, Drucker texted Weinstein that she “got pics,” the Inquirer reported.

Later in the evening, the victim fell ill and passed out in the bathroom, prompting a string of texts from Weinstein, referencing the “spy glasses” he had given Drucker and urging her to get nude photos of the woman. “I will reward you,” he texted, according to the affidavit.

The victim told police she remembered saying her wine “didn’t taste right” on the night of Nov. 10, 2017, and was sick the following morning. She said she didn’t remember anything that happened in between, according to investigators.

Officials said they recovered photos of the victim taken while she was in Drucker’s bathroom.

Detectives later searched Weinstein’s home and said they found photos on Weinstein’s iPad showing him assaulting another unconscious woman in 2012. He’s facing additional charges in that case.

Weinstein and Drucker were released from custody late Tuesday after posting bail, according to court records. They face preliminary hearings on Oct. 18.

No attorney information is available for them. A message seeking comment from Weinstein on a phone listed to him wasn’t returned Wednesday.

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