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Attacker in Minnesota mall stabbing spree had blank look in his eyes

| Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, 9:24 p.m.

ST. CLOUD, Minn. — One of the victims wounded in a stabbing spree in a central Minnesota mall says the man who carried out the attack showed no emotion and his eyes looked blank.

Ryan Schliep, one of 10 people who suffered wounds that were not life-threatening before the attacker was fatally shot, told WCCO-TV that the man “just walked right at me” before striking quickly and penetrating the skin of his scalp.

“He looked just blank in the eyes like he wasn't even there,” Schliep said shortly before being released from a St. Cloud hospital.

Authorities are treating Saturday's stabbings at Crossroads Center Mall as a possible act of terrorism, in part because an Islamic State-run news agency claimed that the attacker was a “soldier of the Islamic State” who had heeded the group's calls for attacks in countries that are part of a U.S.-led anti-ISIS coalition.

It was not immediately known whether the extremist group had planned the attack or knew about it beforehand. St. Cloud police Chief Blair Anderson said Monday that the attack appeared to be the work of a single individual, and there was no sign that the attacker, identified by his father as 20-year-old Dahir Adan, was radicalized or communicated with any terrorist group.

President Obama said the stabbings had no apparent connection to weekend bombings in New York and New Jersey.

Because Adan was Somali, leaders of the state's large Somali community acknowledged the prospect of a “long winter” for their people after the stabbings, but warned not to quickly accept the terrorism connection.

“We cannot give ISIS and other terrorist organizations more air time and propaganda without real facts,” said Jaylani Hussein, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations' Minnesota chapter.

Little is known about Adan, who was identified Sunday by his father, Ahmed Adan. He had only a traffic ticket on his record, was apparently out of work after his job as a part-time security guard ended, and had not enrolled in college since the spring semester. Adan was wearing a security guard's uniform during the attack.

Federal officials released no new information Monday on the investigation into the stabbing, which was stopped by an off-duty police officer after just minutes.

FBI Special Agent in Charge Rick Thornton has said authorities were digging into Adan's background and possible motives, looking at social media accounts and electronic devices and talking to people he knew.

Minnesota has the nation's largest Somali population, an estimated 57,000 people. Both Anderson and Gov. Mark Dayton warned against a possible backlash because of the stabbings, especially in St. Cloud, where Somalis in the 65,000-resident city about 65 miles northwest of Minneapolis have spoken about mistreatment in the past.

“I implore the citizens of St. Cloud and the citizens of Minnesota to rise above this incident and remember our common humanity,” Dayton said.

Somali leaders planned a Monday evening news conference to urge unity.

“It's going to be tough times. We know it's going to be a long winter for this community,” said Haji Yusuf, who is part of UniteCloud, a local group founded to tackle racial and ethnic tension in the city.

Last year, St. Cloud school officials met with Somali parents, community elders and students after Somali-American students walked out to protest their treatment. One student had said Somali-Americans were called Islamic State members and had their headscarves pulled off, and a photo posted on social media of a Somali-American student who was using a wheelchair after breaking her leg with a caption that said she was “disabled in ISIS.”

Five years earlier, CAIR's Minnesota chapter asked for a federal civil rights investigation into allegations that Muslim students had been harassed at two St. Cloud high schools. A 2011 agreement resolved the case, but the U.S. Department of Education still was monitoring the case last year.

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