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Budget cuts take effect as impasse continues

| Friday, March 1, 2013, 10:00 p.m.

WASHINGTON — Gridlocked once again, President Obama and Republican congressional leaders refused to budge in their budget standoff on Friday as $85 billion in across-the-board spending cuts bore down on individual Americans and the nation's recovering economy.

“None of this is necessary,” said the president after a sterile White House meeting that portended a long standoff.

Obama signed an order authorizing the government to begin cutting $85 billion from federal accounts, officially enacting across-the-board reductions that he opposed but failed to avert.

The president met with top lawmakers for less than an hour in the White House, then sought repeatedly to fix the blame on Republicans for the broad spending reductions and any damage that they inflict.

“They've allowed these cuts to happen because they refuse to budge on closing a single wasteful loophole to help reduce the deficit,” Obama said, renewing his demand for a comprehensive deficit-cutting deal that includes higher taxes.

Republicans said they want deficit cuts, too, but not tax increases.

“The president got his tax hikes on Jan. 1,” House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, told reporters, a reference to a $600 billion increase on higher wage earners that cleared Congress on the first day of the year. Now, he said after the meeting, it is time to take on “the spending problem here in Washington.”

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., was equally emphatic. “I will not be part of any back-room deal, and I will absolutely not agree to increase taxes,” he vowed in a written statement.

At the same time they clashed, Obama and Republicans appeared determined to contain their disagreement.

Boehner said the House will pass legislation next week to extend routine funding for government agencies beyond the March 27 expiration.

“I'm hopeful that we won't have to deal with the threat of a government shutdown while we're dealing with the sequester at the same time,” he said, referring to the new cuts by their Washington-speak name.

Obama said he, too, wants to keep the two issues separate.

The Pentagon will absorb half of the $85 billion required to be sliced between now and the end of the budget year on Sept 30, exposing civilian workers to furloughs and defense contractors to possible cancellations. Said Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, only a few days on the job: “We will continue to ensure America's security” despite the challenge posed by an “unnecessary budget crisis.”

The Obama administration has warned of long lines at airports as security personnel are furloughed, of teacher layoffs in some classrooms and adverse impacts on maintenance at the nation's parks.

After days of dire warnings by administration officials, the president told reporters that the effects of the cuts would be felt only gradually.

“The longer these cuts remain in place, the greater the damage to our economy — a slow grind that will intensify with each passing day,” he said.

Much of the budget savings will come through unpaid furloughs for government workers, and those won't begin taking effect until next month.

Obama declined to say whether he bore any of the responsibility for the coming cuts, and he expressed bemusement at any suggestion that he had the ability to force Republicans to agree with him.

“I am not a dictator. I'm the president,” he said. “So ultimately, if Mitch McConnell or John Boehner say we need to go to catch a plane, I can't have Secret Service block the doorway, right?”

He declared he could not perform a “Jedi mind meld” to sway opponents, mixing “Star Wars” and “Star Trek” as he reached for a science-fiction metaphor.

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