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Security plans for Lady Liberty questioned

| Monday, May 27, 2013, 6:09 p.m.

NEW YORK — New security plans for the Statue of Liberty could leave visitors vulnerable when it reopens on July 4, New York officials said on Monday.

Sen. Charles Schumer and New York Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly called for the National Park Service to reverse its plan, which calls for visitors to board boats in either lower Manhattan or New Jersey and stop at nearby Ellis Island for security.

“The NYPD and the Park Service have differences over how to best protect visitors from a potential terrorist attack,” said Kelly, adding that he has written to the secretary of the Interior.

“I know the NPS cares deeply about the monument and its visitors,” said Schumer, “but in this case I think they've made a mistake and should rethink this policy change.”

Park service representatives did not immediately respond to comment requests.

The statue was closed after Superstorm Sandy. Storm surges flooded Liberty Island, destroying boilers and electrical systems, but the statue, which is on higher ground on the island, remained intact.

Previously, passengers were screened with airport-style metal detectors before they boarded boats for Liberty Island from Battery Park in Lower Manhattan and Liberty State Park in New Jersey.

“This screening was put in just after the horrific events of Sept. 11. And I can tell you, in our judgment, the threat has not abated,” Kelly said.

Terrorist groups, he added, “have an interest in targeting locations that represent America.”

Both officials said any additional costs could be covered with a small increase in the fee charged to visit the island.

The Ellis Island Immigration Museum, which suffered severe damage to its infrastructure during the storm, will remain closed for repairs, except for the proposed screening area.

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