ShareThis Page
Nation

Probe advances into autistic teen covered in bodily fluids during Ice Bucket Challenge

| Monday, Sept. 8, 2014, 9:48 p.m.

CLEVELAND — An attorney for the family of an autistic teenager doused with feces and bodily fluids when he thought he was participating in the Ice Bucket Challenge said on Monday that police know who the perpetrators are even as celebrities continue to offer reward money to find those involved.

Attorney Dean Valore, who represents the boy and his family, said that he has spoken with Bay Village police.

“I know police have a very good handle on the investigation,” Valore said. “Everyone's pretty much been identified.”

Bay Village police Chief Mark Spaetzel did not return telephone calls. But Bay Village schools Superintendent Clint Keener said that police have known from “the get-go” who the perpetrators are.

“The investigation is to sort out everyone's involvement and how it came to be,” Keener said.

Police have said the pranksters could face delinquency charges. But the school district likely won't be able to do anything beyond supporting the teenager, Kenner said, because the prank occurred before the start of the school year and off school property.

The prank caught the attention of the world after the mother of the teen, who had been told he was participating in the Ice Bucket Challenge, found a video of it on his cellphone and allowed media outlets to make it available for public viewing.

The celebrity reward offers began Saturday with comedian, game show host and Cleveland native Drew Carey posting to his Twitter account that he'd donate $10,000 if others would join him.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me