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Ex-Ravens cheerleader from Ford City charged with sex with teen

| Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014, 11:42 a.m.
Shattuck
Shattuck
A photo of Molly (George) Shattuck from the Ford City High School yearbook. Shattuck graduated from FCHS in 1985.
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A photo of Molly (George) Shattuck from the Ford City High School yearbook. Shattuck graduated from FCHS in 1985.

A one-time Ford City High School homecoming queen and ex-Baltimore Ravens cheerleader was arraigned Wednesday on charges of having sex with a 15-year-old boy in Delaware.

A grand jury indicted Molly Shattuck, 47, on Monday on two counts of third-degree rape, four counts of unlawful sexual contact and three counts of providing alcohol to minors. She appeared for an arraignment Wednesday in Sussex County Superior Court in Georgetown and was released on $84,000 secured bond.

Shattuck — whose maiden name is George — graduated from Ford City High School in 1985. She was voted homecoming queen in 1984 and went on to earn a marketing degree from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1989.

“She was a sweet girl,” said Ford City resident Dean Hutchison, 48. “I think a lot of guys wanted to date her.”

Hutchison — who graduated with Shattuck — was shocked to see the news of her arrest Wednesday. He said he even wondered at first if it was a hoax. He recalls her as a bubbly cheerleader who grew up outside of Ford City borough.

“I couldn't believe it when I saw the news,” he said.

Shattuck pleaded not guilty to the charges, said defense attorney Eugene Maurer.

Her next court appearance will be at a Dec. 15 case review.

“Like anybody who would be charged with an offense of this nature, she's quite distraught and dealing with it the best she can,” Maurer added. “Obviously, she's very upset about it.”

On Sept. 26, a 15-year-old boy told police that Shattuck began an inappropriate relationship with him near Baltimore and that it culminated with sexual activity at a vacation rental home in Bethany Beach over Labor Day weekend, said Delaware State Police Sgt. Paul Shavack. Police executed a search warrant on Shattuck's Maryland home Oct. 1 and seized items. Shavack declined to specify what they were.

The indictment alleges that Shattuck provided alcohol to three boys under the legal drinking age on Aug. 30 and Aug. 31. It charges that she had sexual contact with one boy on or about Aug. 31.

In Delaware, third-degree rape applies to several instances, including when an older person has sex with an underage person. It is a Class B felony, punishable by two to 25 years in prison.

In a letter sent Wednesday to parents, the headmaster of the school the teen attends — the McDonogh School in Owings Mills, Md. — wrote he became aware of “inappropriate behavior by a current parent” and a student on Sept. 24 and reported the allegations to police.

“While I was instructed by the police not to communicate with you until now because of the criminal investigation, I want you to know that the parent has been prohibited from entering McDonogh's campus and additional security measures have been in place to assure the safety of students since the incident was reported,” Headmaster Charlie Britton wrote.

Shattuck's website says she has three children, including a 15-year-old son.

Shattuck is separated from Mayo Shattuck, 60, former CEO of Baltimore-based Constellation Energy Nuclear Group and current chairman of Chicago-based Exelon Corp. Exelon, which has electric and gas utilities in Maryland, Illinois and Pennsylvania, now owns Constellation.

According to online Maryland court records, Molly and Mayo Shattuck filed for divorce Sept. 29 in Baltimore County. The Baltimore Sun reported in March that the couple had separated, although Molly Shattuck demurred to the newspaper about when the breakup occurred, saying, “It's been awhile.”

In 2005, Molly Shattuck became the oldest NFL cheerleader in history up to that time when the Ravens selected her for the squad on her first tryout. She cheered for two years and was a part-time coach for six more years.

Shattuck is a fitness consultant and advocate, and published a book in February called “Vibrant Living.” Her website, which is now in “maintenance mode,” says she has developed a 21-day plan for health and improved living. A cached version of her biography on the site says she is an ambassador for the American Diabetes Association and works with the American Heart Association. She's a trustee of the United Way of Central Maryland, and a member of boards for the Baltimore School for the Arts, the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and the National Children's Museum.

In 2008, Shattuck appeared on an episode of the ABC-TV reality show “Secret Millionaire” and gave away $190,000 to people helping the poor.

Last year, Shattuck gave IUP $250,000 through the Shattuck Family Foundation. The donation established the Molly George Shattuck '89 Leadership Fund to support women enrolled in the university's Eberly College of Business Information and Technology, according to an IUP publication.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. Julie E. Martin is a staff writer for Trib Total Media.

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