ShareThis Page
Nation

Religious affiliation continues to fade in U.S., but prayer remains popular, study finds

| Saturday, March 7, 2015, 10:20 p.m.

American religion is on the ropes, but it has a prayer.

A record-low share of Americans attend church regularly, affiliate with a religious faith and see themselves as religious, according to a major survey.

The findings mark a continuation of a decades-long departure from the pews along with a growing share who profess loyalty to no religion at all. But whatever Americans' hang-ups with weekend services and denominational ties, they haven't stopped praying on their own.

Fully 57 percent of respondents said they pray at least once a day, little different from 54 percent in 1983, when the question was first asked on the survey. Three-quarters of respondents said they pray at least once a week, and 1 in 4 pray less often or never.

The national survey is the broadest study of attitudes in the United States. It has been conducted at least every two years since 1972 by the independent research organization NORC, at the University of Chicago.

The stability of prayer contrasts sharply with erosion on other measures of religious commitment. Since 2006, the percentage of people describing themselves as “very” or “moderately” religious has declined eight percentage points, from 62 percent to 54 percent. The share affiliating with a particular faith has fallen from more than 90 percent in the 1980s and 1990s to 79 percent in 2014. About 4 in 10 report attending services at least once a month, down roughly 10 points from three decades ago. All are record lows.

The resilience of prayer reflects a broader shift in Americans' understanding of religion, said Christian Smith, a professor of sociology who leads the University of Notre Dame's Center for the Study of Religion and Society.

“Religion is gradually becoming more personal, private, subjective in practice” and “less public, institutional and shared,” Smith said. “People still believe religious things and practice religion ‘in their heads,' as in prayer, but are less institutionally connected and engage in fewer public, institution-centered observations.”

Jesuit priest James Martin, author of “Jesus: A Pilgrimage,” said prayer's durability owes to a more basic need. “It's intensely human. Even if you don't like your local parish, you can't get away from that human instinct to pray.”

Many who have shed affiliations or seldom attend services continue to pray regularly, according to the survey. About 1 in 4 Americans who report no religious preference say they pray at least once a day, as do about 3 in 10 of those who never attend religious services.

Millennials have led the shift away from religious affiliation. The share of younger adults who affiliated with a faith in 2014 is 19 percentage points below that of young adults three decades ago.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me