ShareThis Page
World

'Burial slab' of Jesus found in Jerusalem church

| Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, 11:10 p.m.
Workers remove the top marble layer of the tomb said to be of Jesus Christ on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in the Church of Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem.
Workers remove the top marble layer of the tomb said to be of Jesus Christ on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016, in the Church of Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem.

Researchers recently uncovered a stone burial slab that many believe Jesus Christ's body may have been laid on following his death.

The original surface of the tomb was uncovered in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in the Old City of Jerusalem during restoration work and has been covered by marble cladding since at least 1555 A.D., National Geographic reports.

The marble cover was pulled back, and researchers were surprised by the amount of fill material beneath the covering, Fredrik Hiebert, an archaeologist-in-residence at the National Geographic Society, and a researcher on the restoration project, told National Geographic.

“It will be a long scientific analysis, but we will finally be able to see the original rock surface on which, according to tradition, the body of Christ was laid,” Hiebert told National Geographic.

National Geographic is filming the restoration process for the Explorer series, which will air in November.

According to the Bible, the body of Jesus Christ was laid on a burial bed, or slab of limestone following his crucifixion.

Christians believe that Christ was resurrected following his death, and women who came to anoint his body three days after the burial reported that Jesus' remains had vanished.

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre was built by the Emperor Constantine in 325 A.D., and has long been considered by Christians to be the spot where Jesus Christ was buried, AP reported.

In June, a team of experts began renovations on the church and the Edicule or ancient chamber that held Jesus' tomb, AP reported.

The exposure of the burial bed will allow researchers to answer questions about the original form of the tomb, Antonia Moropoulou, of the National Technical University of Athens, told National Geographic.

“We are at the critical moment for rehabilitating the Edicule,” Moropoulou, who is supervising the restoration. “The techniques we're using to document this unique monument will enable the world to study our findings as if they themselves were in the tomb of Christ.”

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me