ShareThis Page
World

Uber moving self-driving fleet from San Francisco to Arizona

| Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016, 12:18 a.m.
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber loaded its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix. Courtesy of Uber.
Uber loaded its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix. Courtesy of Uber.
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.
Uber
Uber loaded up its San Francisco fleet of self-driving cars on a self-driving Otto truck Thursday morning bound for Arizona. The company will move its self-driving pilot to Phoenix.

Uber's fleet of self-driving cars in San Francisco is bound of Arizona, a company spokesman said.

The ride-sharing company loaded up its fleet on a truck Thursday morning.

“We'll be expanding our self-driving pilot there in the next few weeks, and we're excited to have the support of Governor Ducey,” the company said.

Uber will move its pilot test of self-driving cars to Phoenix.

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey said the state will welcome Uber “with open arms and open roads.”

“While California puts the brakes on innovation and change with more bureaucracy and more regulation, Arizona is paving the way for new technology and new businesses,” Ducey said in a statement Thursday, noting an executive order he signed in 2015 supporting testing of self-driving cars in the state. “This is about economic development, but it's also about changing the way we live and work. Arizona is proud to be open for business. California may not want you, but we do.”

Uber pulled its self-driving cars from California roads after state regulators moved to revoke their registrations, officials said Wednesday.

The move comes after a week of talks between the ride-sharing company and state regulators failed.

Hours after Uber launched the service in its hometown of San Francisco, the DMV threatened legal action if the company did not stop. The cars need the same special permit as the 20 other companies testing self-driving technology in California, regulators argued.

Uber maintains it does not need a permit because the cars are not sophisticated enough to continuously drive themselves, although the company promotes them as “self-driving.”

The DMV said the registrations for the vehicles were improperly issued because they were not properly marked as test vehicles. It invited Uber to seek a permit so their vehicles could operate legally in California — an offer the company said it did not plan to accept.

Uber said in a statement that it was looking for where it could redeploy the cars, but remained 100 percent committed to California and would redouble its efforts “to develop workable statewide rules.”

The ride-sharing company says the cars must constantly be monitored by a human driver trained to take control at any time, so they don't fall under California's permitting requirements for “autonomous vehicles.”

San Francisco is Uber's second self-driving city; its first cars have been cruising around Pittsburgh since September.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me