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Journalist, congressional hopeful is shot dead in Honduras

| Thursday, June 15, 2017, 11:27 p.m.
This handout photo taken on May 26, 2017 and released by the Honduran newspaper La Tribuna shows Victor Funez, a TV host and candidate for the governing National Party who was murdered in the city of La Ceiba, 300 km north of Tegucigalpa, on June 15, 2017.
A suspect, Alvaro Euceda, was seized along with the gun and motorcycle allegedly used to kill Funez, a TV host who was a candidate for the November legislative elections in Honduras. Human rights organizations said Funez was the 70th journalist killed in Honduras since 2003.
AFP/Getty Images
This handout photo taken on May 26, 2017 and released by the Honduran newspaper La Tribuna shows Victor Funez, a TV host and candidate for the governing National Party who was murdered in the city of La Ceiba, 300 km north of Tegucigalpa, on June 15, 2017. A suspect, Alvaro Euceda, was seized along with the gun and motorcycle allegedly used to kill Funez, a TV host who was a candidate for the November legislative elections in Honduras. Human rights organizations said Funez was the 70th journalist killed in Honduras since 2003.
This handout photo released by the Honduran National Police shows Alvaro Euceda (C), accused of committing the murder of journalist Victor Funez, in police custody in La Ceiba, a city 300 km north of Tegucigalpa, on June 15, 2017. 
Euceda was seized along with the gun and motorcycle allegedly used to kill Funez, a TV host who was a candidate for the November legislative elections in Honduras.
AFP/Getty Images
This handout photo released by the Honduran National Police shows Alvaro Euceda (C), accused of committing the murder of journalist Victor Funez, in police custody in La Ceiba, a city 300 km north of Tegucigalpa, on June 15, 2017. Euceda was seized along with the gun and motorcycle allegedly used to kill Funez, a TV host who was a candidate for the November legislative elections in Honduras.

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — A Honduran journalist running for a congressional seat was shot to death outside his home Thursday in the Caribbean coast city of La Ceiba, authorities and colleagues reported.

Security Minister Julian Pacheco said Victor Funez was intercepted by a helmeted gunman on a motorcycle before dawn as the journalist was about to enter his house in the neighborhood of La Gloria.

Surveillance camera video provided by police shows the attacker shooting from close range at the head of the victim, who falls to the sidewalk. The attacker appears to fire at the body twice more and take the victim's wallet before fleeing.

Police said they arrested and were questioning a suspect.

Funez, 36, was better known as “El Masa” and directed the nighttime show “Panorama Nocturno” on the local channel 45 station.

Station owner Rodolfo Irias described him as a “great journalist.”

“He was beloved by viewers because he carried out intense and frequent campaigns for the benefit of them and the community,” Irias said.

Funez recently won a primary in Atlantida province and was preparing to run in November elections as a congressional candidate for the governing National Party.

“This crime will not go unpunished,” Pacheco said at a news conference.

Funez is the 70th journalist slain in Honduras since 2001, according to the governmental National Council on Human Rights. About 90 percent of those killings have never been solved.

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