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Father of Colorado boy, 13, arrested for son's 2012 death

| Saturday, July 22, 2017, 11:03 p.m.
In this Nov. 26, 2012 file photo, a missing poster of 13-year-old Dylan Redwine hangs on a trail head sign next to Vallecito Reservoir in Vallecito, Colo. Police on Saturday arrested Mark Redwine for the death of his 13-year-old son.
In this Nov. 26, 2012 file photo, a missing poster of 13-year-old Dylan Redwine hangs on a trail head sign next to Vallecito Reservoir in Vallecito, Colo. Police on Saturday arrested Mark Redwine for the death of his 13-year-old son.

DENVER — A Colorado man was arrested Saturday in connection with the 2012 death of his 13-year-old son, police said.

Mark Redwine's arrest in Bellingham, Wash., followed a grand jury indictment for second-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.

Redwine is being held on $1 million cash-only bond, KDVR-TV in Denver reported..

Mark Redwine and Elaine Hall, the boy's mother, had gone through a contentious divorce and custody battle. Mark Redwine has denied any involvement in Dylan's death.

Some of Dylan Redwine's remains were found about 10 miles from his father's home in Vallecito in 2013. The boy had reluctantly traveled to be with his father for a court-ordered visit the previous Thanksgiving. Dylan's skull was found by hikers in 2015, and forensic anthropologists said the skull had injuries consistent with blunt force trauma at two locations, the indictment said.

Surveillance video from the airport where Dylan's flight arrived shows little or no interaction between the boy and his father, according to the indictment. Several witnesses said Dylan did not want to visit his father, after the two argued and fought during his previous visit.

Text messages showed that Dylan had asked to stay with a friend on the night of his arrival, but Mark Redwine denied the request, the indictment said. Next morning the boy's friend sent a text to Dylan asking “where are you” and got no response.

Mark Redwine and Hall leveled accusations at each other during appearances on the syndicated “Dr. Phil” TV show in 2013 as the case drew national attention, the Denver Post reported. TV host Nancy Grace also did a show Dylan's disappearance.

Shortly after his disappearance, bracelets imprinted with “Find Dylan Redwine” sold for $5 each to raise money for the search, the Post reported. Volunteers scoured a forest near Lake Vallecito. A benefit dinner, Crime Stoppers and assorted donors raised $50,000 in a single month to offer as a reward, the newspaper reported.

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