ShareThis Page
World

Pope adds 35 saints to church, nearly all martyrs

| Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, 10:00 a.m.
Pope Francis' pastoral staff is hit by a ray of the sun during the canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis' pastoral staff is hit by a ray of the sun during the canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis, background center, celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis, background center, celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis bows in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis bows in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis, background center, walks with his pastoral staff as he arrives to celebrate a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)
Pope Francis, background center, walks with his pastoral staff as he arrives to celebrate a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis, who often laments current persecutions of Christians, has given the Catholic Church 35 new saints, nearly all of them martyrs, from past centuries.

The latest saints were proclaimed Sunday during a Mass celebrated by Francis in St. Peter's Square and attended by some 35,000 faithful, many of them pilgrims from the homelands of those being honored.

Thirty martyrs, including priests and lay persons, suffered anti-Catholic persecution in 1645 at the hands of Dutch Calvinists in Brazil, while three children, ages 12 and 13 who were indigenous persons in Mexico, were martyred in the 1520s for refusing to renounce their Catholic faith and return to their ancient traditions.

The other two new saints are a 20th-century priest from Spain and an Italian priest who died in 1739.

Since becoming pontiff in 2013, Francis has repeatedly paid tribute to Christians suffering or even dying for their faith in current times, especially in the Middle East.

At the end of the canonization ceremony, Francis hailed the new saints as “shining witnesses to the Gospel.” In recent decades, the Church has stressed that the latest saints can serve as role models for today's Catholics.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me