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Search ends for 3 U.S. sailors missing in Navy aircraft crash

| Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017, 10:30 p.m.
In this March 14, 2017, file photo, a U.S. Navy C-2 Greyhound approaches the deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson during the annual joint military exercise called Foal Eagle between South Korea and the United States at an unidentified location in the international waters, east of the Korean Peninsula. A similar type of the U.S. Navy plane carrying 11 crew and passengers crashed into the Pacific Ocean on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, while on the way to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier, the Navy said.
In this March 14, 2017, file photo, a U.S. Navy C-2 Greyhound approaches the deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson during the annual joint military exercise called Foal Eagle between South Korea and the United States at an unidentified location in the international waters, east of the Korean Peninsula. A similar type of the U.S. Navy plane carrying 11 crew and passengers crashed into the Pacific Ocean on Wednesday, Nov. 22, 2017, while on the way to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier, the Navy said.

TOKYO — The search has ended for three sailors missing in the Philippine Sea since a U.S. Navy aircraft crashed on Wednesday, the Navy said Friday.

The C-2A “Greyhound” transport aircraft was traveling to the USS Ronald Reagan aircraft carrier when it crashed. Eight people were rescued quickly and are in good condition, but Japanese and U.S. ships and aircraft had continued searching for the others.

The Navy's 7th Fleet said details of the three missing sailors were being withheld pending completion of notification of next of kin procedures.

The Navy is investigating the crash.

The twin-propeller plane crashed about 500 nautical miles (925 kilometers) southeast of Okinawa while bringing passengers and cargo from Japan to the aircraft carrier.

The Reagan was participating in a joint exercise with Japan's navy when the plane crashed. It was leading the search and rescue efforts along with Japan's naval forces.

The Navy describes the Nov. 16-26 joint exercise in waters off Okinawa as the “premier training event” between the U.S. and Japanese navies, designed to increase defensive readiness and interoperability in air and sea operations.

The Navy's Japan-based 7th Fleet has had two fatal naval accidents in Asian waters this year, leaving 17 sailors dead and prompting the removal of eight top Navy officers from their posts, including the 7th Fleet commander.

The USS John S. McCain and an oil tanker collided near Singapore in August, leaving 10 U.S. sailors dead. Seven sailors died in June when the USS Fitzgerald and a container ship collided off Japan. The Navy has concluded the collisions were avoidable and recommended changes including improved training and increasing sleep and stress management for sailors.

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