ShareThis Page
World

Even the eyelashes freeze: Russia sees minus 88.6 degrees F

| Tuesday, Jan. 16, 2018, 3:39 p.m.
In this photo taken on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, Anastasia Gruzdeva, left, poses for selfie with her friends as the temperature dropped to about -58 degrees Fahrenheit in Yakutsk, Russia. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near-record lows, plunging to -88.6 degrees Fahrenheit in some areas.
sakhalife.ru photo via AP
In this photo taken on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, Anastasia Gruzdeva, left, poses for selfie with her friends as the temperature dropped to about -58 degrees Fahrenheit in Yakutsk, Russia. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near-record lows, plunging to -88.6 degrees Fahrenheit in some areas.
In this photo taken on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, thermometer shows as the temperature dropped to -85 degrees Fahrenheit in Tomtor village in the east of Yakutia, the center of the 2nd Borogonsky heritage of the Oymyakonsky ulus. Tomtor is known as the 'Pole of Cold', although this title is disputed by two more settlements Oimyakon and Verkhoyansk. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near-record lows, plunging to -88.6 degrees Fahrenheit in some areas.
sakhalife.ru photo via AP
In this photo taken on Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018, thermometer shows as the temperature dropped to -85 degrees Fahrenheit in Tomtor village in the east of Yakutia, the center of the 2nd Borogonsky heritage of the Oymyakonsky ulus. Tomtor is known as the 'Pole of Cold', although this title is disputed by two more settlements Oimyakon and Verkhoyansk. Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia have dropped to near-record lows, plunging to -88.6 degrees Fahrenheit in some areas.

MOSCOW — Even thermometers can't keep up with the plunging temperatures in Russia's remote Yakutia region, which hit minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit in some areas Tuesday.

In Yakutia — a region of 1 million people about 3,300 miles east of Moscow — students routinely go to school even in minus 40 degrees. But school was canceled Tuesday throughout the region and police ordered parents to keep their children inside.

In the village of Oymyakon, one of the coldest inhabited places on earth, state-owned Russian television showed the mercury falling to the bottom of a thermometer that was only set up to measure down to minus 50 degrees. In 2013, Oymyakon recorded an all-time low of minus 98 Fahrenheit.

Over the weekend, two men froze to death when they tried to walk to a nearby farm after their car broke down. Three other men with them survived because they were wearing warmer clothes, investigators reported.

But the press office for Yakutia's governor said Tuesday that all households and businesses in the region have working central heating and access to backup power generators.

Residents of Yakutia are no strangers to cold weather and this week's cold spell was not even dominating local news headlines Tuesday.

But some media outlets published cold-weather selfies and stories about stunts in the extreme cold. Women posted pictures of their frozen eyelashes, while YakutiaMedia published a picture of Chinese students who got undressed to take a plunge in a thermal spring.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me