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Yoi! Trump's SOTU speech revives Steelers drinking game

Rebecca Poole
| Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, 2:54 p.m.
Late Pittsburgh Steelers broadcaster Myron Cope works a Steelers game against the New York Jets.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Late Pittsburgh Steelers broadcaster Myron Cope works a Steelers game against the New York Jets.
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, for his address to a joint session of Congress. No natural orator, Trump has nonetheless shown at times that he can deliver a powerful speech that effectively outlines his vision, strikes an emotional chord and moves commentators to declare that he, at last, looks presidential. And then the teleprompter gets turned off. (Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Image via AP, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, for his address to a joint session of Congress. No natural orator, Trump has nonetheless shown at times that he can deliver a powerful speech that effectively outlines his vision, strikes an emotional chord and moves commentators to declare that he, at last, looks presidential. And then the teleprompter gets turned off. (Jim Lo Scalzo/Pool Image via AP, File)
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (7) celebrates his touchdown pass to Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Santonio Holmes during the fourth quarter of the NFL Super Bowl XLIII football game, Sunday, Feb. 1, 2009, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger (7) celebrates his touchdown pass to Pittsburgh Steelers wide receiver Santonio Holmes during the fourth quarter of the NFL Super Bowl XLIII football game, Sunday, Feb. 1, 2009, in Tampa, Fla. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
HOUSTON, TX - FEBRUARY 05: Tom Brady #12 of the New England Patriots reacts after a touchdown late in the fourth quarter against the Atlanta Falcons during Super Bowl 51 at NRG Stadium on February 5, 2017 in Houston, Texas.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Getty Images
HOUSTON, TX - FEBRUARY 05: Tom Brady #12 of the New England Patriots reacts after a touchdown late in the fourth quarter against the Atlanta Falcons during Super Bowl 51 at NRG Stadium on February 5, 2017 in Houston, Texas. (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Heidi Murrin | Trib Total Media

Any true Pittsburgh Steelers fan knows how to play the Myron Cope drinking game.

If the radio color commentator shrieked "Yoi!" to describe a splendid on-field play, all listeners within earshot were to down a shot of their favorite spirit.

"Double Yoi!" — Two shots.

"Yoi and Double Yoi!" — You guessed it: Drink three shots.

Some of Cope's radio colleagues still use the same semantics, enabling fans to play even 10 years after the beloved broadcaster's death.

But the Steelers are out for the season, leaving fans with a bitter pill to swallow as the hated Patriots return to the Super Bowl this weekend.

Just as the long winter of despair sets in, there's some hope on the horizon for thirsty, lonely fans.

President Trump gives his first State of The Union address tonight. The nation can embark on a new game, with more possibilities than previously thought possible.

Raise your glass to the State of the Union Drinking Game .

Reported by North Central College Student News, players are to take a drink when they hear the president:

• Use reassuring phrases, such as "trust me" or "believe me";

• Use superlatives, such as "the likes of which have never been seen before," "the greatest," or "unbelievable";

• Discuss topics including "the wall," "Obamacare" or any reference to China or Russia (vodka only on this one);

• Bash the media, using "fake news media." Make it a double if the phrases "very unfair" or "witch hunt" are included.

Another version of the game , detailed by Rolling Stone, instructs players to drink if Trump:

• Uses the "pinchy hands" gesture (up to a maximum of three times).

• Sniffles with suspicious vigorousness (again, maximum three shots).

• Pulls a Kobe Bryant special and overcompliments his wife in embarrassingly public fashion in the wake of the Stormy Daniels story.

And the magazine offers a bonus round after the speech:

1. THE VAN JONES RULE: Finish the ENTIRE BOTTLE of whatever you are drinking if anyone on any of the major networks describes the speech as "presidential" or says something along the lines of: "He became president tonight."

2. THE LOU DOBBS RULE: If at the end of the speech you are not yet inebriated, turn to the Fox Business channel and take two despair shots.

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