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Pat Robertson, prominent televangelist, is recovering from a stroke

| Saturday, Feb. 3, 2018, 11:48 p.m.
In this Friday, Oct. 23, 2015 file photo, Rev. Pat Robertson poses a question to a Republican presidential candidate during a forum at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Va. The Christian Broadcasting Network, which Robertson founded, says he was rushed to the nearest stroke center Friday, Feb. 2, 2018 after a family member recognized the onset of stroke symptoms, and the 87-year-old Robertson is alert and expected to make a full recovery.
In this Friday, Oct. 23, 2015 file photo, Rev. Pat Robertson poses a question to a Republican presidential candidate during a forum at Regent University in Virginia Beach, Va. The Christian Broadcasting Network, which Robertson founded, says he was rushed to the nearest stroke center Friday, Feb. 2, 2018 after a family member recognized the onset of stroke symptoms, and the 87-year-old Robertson is alert and expected to make a full recovery.

Longtime televangelist Pat Robertson is recovering after suffering an embolic stroke, according to the Christian Broadcasting Network, a Virginia-based television network Robertson founded.

Robertson, 87, was rushed to the nearest stroke center Friday after a family member recognized “the onset of symptoms,” the CBN report says.

“Within minutes of receiving (clot-busting drugs), Dr. Robertson was awake and responsive and able to move all of his limbs,” CBN states. He is expected to make a full recovery.

Robertson hosts CBN's flagship show, “The 700 Club,” where he has praised and interviewed President Trump during his campaign and after his election. Robertson and some other evangelical leaders have stood by the president, even after some thought they might abandon him. Robertson, for instance, called Trump's “Access Hollywood” video “macho talk.” In the fall, Robertson connected the Las Vegas mass shooting to disrespect for Trump.

For decades, Robertson has been an influential leader among certain kinds of evangelicals who consider themselves to be charismatic or Pentecostal, including those who might engage in healing services and speaking in tongues.

Robertson has founded numerous organizations, including Regent University, which is based in Virginia Beach. Robertson's past remarks, including a claim that the 2010 earthquake in Haiti was God's judgment, have generated controversy.

The son of a U.S. senator, Robertson campaigned to become the Republican Party's nominee in the 1988 presidential election. He also founded the American Center for Law & Justice, a conservative organization that is seen as often being in opposition to the American Civil Liberties Union.

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