ShareThis Page
World

Parade or helmets: What could $10 million buy?

| Wednesday, Feb. 14, 2018, 2:30 p.m.
President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron during Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris, Friday, July 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
President Donald Trump and French President Emmanuel Macron during Bastille Day parade on the Champs Elysees avenue in Paris, Friday, July 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

President Trump's proposed military parade could cost about $10 million to $30 million, according to the Washington Post, which raises an obvious question: How else could that money could be used?

Although popular with area veterans , the proposal has had a mixed reception nationally. In addition to unfavorable comparisons to North Korea and Russia, one of the main complaints is that it would waste money that has better uses.

Using the lower estimate of $10 million, a short list of alternates Trump's parade cost could cover includes (or triple the number of items if you think it will cost the upper limit of the estimate):

• Medical costs of at least 1,260 veterans in Westmoreland County and 677 in Allegheny County.

Veterans Affairs data shows that the average cost in 2016 was $7,936.28 per patient. The average cost in Allegheny County was about $14,769.25 per patient.

• Equipping more than 3,000 Marines with the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle. The Marine Corps is planning to buy about 50,000 and would like even more.

• Buying about 30,000 Advanced Combat Helmets for the Army, which plans to buy about 294,000 over the next five years.

Brian Bowling is a Tribune-Review staff writer. Reach him at 724-850-1218, bbowling@tribweb.com or via Twitter @TribBrian.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me