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After school shooting, Florida leaders propose new gun laws

| Friday, Feb. 23, 2018, 4:06 p.m.
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School bus driver Pearlie Corker, gets a hug at the school as some teachers return for the first time since the shooting, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 in Parkland, Fla. Corker arrived at the school as Nicklaus Cruz began to shoot students and teachers on February 14th, she stayed on the bus in front of the school praying for the students and teachers. The school is scheduled to reopen next week.
Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School bus driver Pearlie Corker, gets a hug at the school as some teachers return for the first time since the shooting, Friday, Feb. 23, 2018 in Parkland, Fla. Corker arrived at the school as Nicklaus Cruz began to shoot students and teachers on February 14th, she stayed on the bus in front of the school praying for the students and teachers. The school is scheduled to reopen next week.
Florida Governor Rick Scott leaves the room after his school safety proposal press conference at the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Feb 23, 2018. Scott proposed banning the sale of firearms to anyone younger than 21 as part of a plan to prevent gun violence.
Florida Governor Rick Scott leaves the room after his school safety proposal press conference at the Florida Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Feb 23, 2018. Scott proposed banning the sale of firearms to anyone younger than 21 as part of a plan to prevent gun violence.

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. — Nine days after the Florida school shooting, Gov. Rick Scott and Republican legislators announced school safety and gun restriction proposals that would ban the sale of firearms to anyone under 21, but they differed on whether some teachers should carry guns.

The action came Friday as teachers returned for the first time to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School since the Valentine's Day shooting that killed 17 people. The Broward County school superintendent said he is adamantly opposed to teachers having guns. But President Donald Trump repeated in several appearances Friday that he favors the idea.

Scott, a Republican widely expected to run for the Senate, outlined his plan at a Tallahassee news conference. In addition to banning firearm sales to anyone under 21, the governor called for a trained law enforcement officer for every school — and one for every 1,000 students at larger schools — by the time the fall 2018 school year begins.

Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, which has more than 3,000 students, had one armed resource officer, who never entered the building under attack while a gunman was shooting people inside, officials said.

That failure, plus reports of a delay in security camera footage scanned by responding police and several records about the troubled background of 19-year-old suspect Nikolas Cruz, added to what the Florida House speaker called an “abject breakdown at all levels.” Cruz is jailed on 17 counts of murder and has confessed to the shootings, investigators say.

Among other things, the governor's $500 million plan would create a “violent threat restraining order” that would let a court prohibit a violent or mentally ill person from purchasing or possessing a firearm or any other weapon under certain circumstances.

The proposal would also strengthen gun purchase and possession restrictions for mentally ill people under the state's Baker Act, which allows someone to be involuntarily hospitalized for up to 72 hours. Scott is seeking $50 million for mental health initiatives that include expanding mental health services by providing counseling, crisis management and other mental health services for youth and young adults.

“No one with mental issues should have access to a gun. It is common sense. It for their own best interest, much less the best interest of our communities,” Scott said.

The governor's plan made no mention of arming teachers on school grounds

However, the Legislature's Republican leadership proposed letting teachers carry a gun if they have had law enforcement training — a provision that House Speaker Richard Corcoran called a “game changer.” The legislators' plan also calls for a three-day waiting period for most gun purchases, with exceptions.

Democrats said neither plan goes far enough.

“Unfortunately, both plans omit a third, critically important piece of legislation Democrats have been and continue to push for: a ban on assault weapons and high capacity magazines,” said state Senate Democratic Leader Oscar Braynon. He added that recent mass shootings show that “so long as these high powered weapons of war remain available for purchase these killings will continue.”

Talia Rumsky, a 16-year-old Stoneman Douglas High student who was at school during the shooting, was among those who travelled to Tallahassee Wednesday to lobby lawmakers about gun control.

She said Scott's plan to make it illegal for anyone under 21 to purchase a gun is a start, but said she doesn't think it goes far enough.

“This is a great first step and we appreciate it,” the sophomore said. “But it's not enough and we're going to make sure they know it's not enough and is not solving our problems.”

Although Trump and some Florida legislative Republicans favor arming teachers, Broward schools Superintendent Robert Runcie called that a non-starter.

“I am totally against arming teachers,” he said. “They have a challenging job as it is.”

Trump told reporters Friday that schools need some kind of “offensive” capability to deter and respond to attackers.

“If they're not gun free, if there are guns inside, held by the right people, by highly trained professionals, you're going to see this end. It won't be happening again. Our schools are essentially gun-free zones and that makes them very dangerous places,” the president said.

After days of funerals for those killed in the attack, teachers began the emotionally fraught process of returning to the school Friday to collect belongings from classrooms that have been off-limits since the slayings. Following an orientation Sunday for teachers and students, classes resume Wednesday.

Broward teachers union president Anna Fusco met with the teachers as they returned to campus Friday hailing them as “incredibly brave and strong.”

“I met with one that was grazed with a bullet ... she has a hole in her arm and a bruise from her shoulder to her elbow that looks like somebody whacked her with a bat and she's like, ‘I'm here because we need to get things ready,” Fusco said.

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