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Latest on nor'easter: Woman crushed by tree while shoveling; thousands without power

| Thursday, March 8, 2018, 2:15 p.m.
Upton Department of Public Works worker Rob Marcoux, of Bellingham, Mass., uses a chainsaw to cut up fallen tree limbs, Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Upton. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.
Upton Department of Public Works worker Rob Marcoux, of Bellingham, Mass., uses a chainsaw to cut up fallen tree limbs, Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Upton. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.
In this frame from video, a pair of good Samaritans push a motorist who was stuck in deep snow during a snowstorm, Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Freeport, Maine.
In this frame from video, a pair of good Samaritans push a motorist who was stuck in deep snow during a snowstorm, Thursday, March 8, 2018, in Freeport, Maine.
Men shovel snow while trying to free a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J.
Men shovel snow while trying to free a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J.
Men shovel snow while trying to free a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
Men shovel snow while trying to free a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)
A tree branch fallen from the weight of heavy snow lies on top of a fire truck in East Hartford, Conn., Thursday, March 8, 2018. The branch that fell took down live power lines and landed onto the truck as it was parked responding to a fire. No one was injured. Connecticut's two major utilities were reporting more than 125,000 power outages Thursday morning.
A tree branch fallen from the weight of heavy snow lies on top of a fire truck in East Hartford, Conn., Thursday, March 8, 2018. The branch that fell took down live power lines and landed onto the truck as it was parked responding to a fire. No one was injured. Connecticut's two major utilities were reporting more than 125,000 power outages Thursday morning.
A person walks near the platform at the Morristown train station during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Morristown, N.J.
A person walks near the platform at the Morristown train station during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Morristown, N.J.
Waves crash against houses Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Scituate, Mass. Utilities are racing to restore power to thousands of customers in the Northeast still without electricity after last week's storm as another one threatens the hard-hit area with heavy, wet snow, high winds, and more outages.
Waves crash against houses Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Scituate, Mass. Utilities are racing to restore power to thousands of customers in the Northeast still without electricity after last week's storm as another one threatens the hard-hit area with heavy, wet snow, high winds, and more outages.
Brian Farrell, of Walpole, Mass., left, enters his home Thursday, March 8, 2018, after a tree fell on the house and a car, right, in Walpole. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.
Brian Farrell, of Walpole, Mass., left, enters his home Thursday, March 8, 2018, after a tree fell on the house and a car, right, in Walpole. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.
A maintenance staffer spreads ice melt in front of the Provincial Towers building in Wilkes Barre, Pa., Wednesday, March 7, 2018.
A maintenance staffer spreads ice melt in front of the Provincial Towers building in Wilkes Barre, Pa., Wednesday, March 7, 2018.
A Portland, Maine resident uses a snowblower to clear snow during a nor'easter, Thursday, March 8, 2018. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.
A Portland, Maine resident uses a snowblower to clear snow during a nor'easter, Thursday, March 8, 2018. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter.

HARTFORD, Conn. — Residents in the Northeast dug out from as much as 2 feet of wet, heavy snow Thursday, while utilities dealt with downed trees and electric lines that snarled traffic and left hundreds of thousands without power after two strong nor'easters in less than a week — all with possibility of another storm in the wings.

With many schools closed for a second consecutive day Thursday, forecasters tracked the possibility of yet another late-season snowstorm to run up the coast early next week.

“The strength of it and how close it comes to the coast will make all the difference. At this point it's too early to say,” said Jim Nodchey, a National Weather Service meteorologist in Massachusetts. “We're just looking at a chance.”

Snow was still falling Thursday in southern Maine, where the storm was expected to move on by midday.

More than 800,000 customers were without power in the Northeast, including some who have been without electricity since last Friday's destructive nor'easter. Thousands of flights across the region were canceled, and traveling on the ground was treacherous.

Police say an 88-year-old woman was killed by a tree that fell and crushed her as she shoveled snow in the New York City suburbs.

Suffern Police Chief Clarke Osborn tells the Journal News that Barbara Suleski was injured around 5 p.m. Wednesday and died at a hospital.

Neighbors were trying to help her when police arrived. Live wires wrapped around the tree made the rescue more difficult.

Another large branch broke off a tree and fell near emergency workers along with wires.

A train carrying more than 100 passengers derailed in Wilmington, Massachusetts, after a fallen tree branch got wedged in a rail switch. Nobody was hurt. Tory Mazzola, a spokesman for Keolis Commuter Services, which runs the system for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, said the low-speed derailment remains under investigation.

In New Hampshire, Interstate 95 in Portsmouth was closed in both directions because of downed power lines, leaving traffic at a standstill.

Amtrak restored modified service between New York City and Boston on Thursday after suspending it because of the storm. New York City's Metro-North commuter railroad, which had suspended service on lines connecting the city to its northern suburbs and Connecticut because of downed trees, restored partial service Thursday.

Members of the Northeastern University women's basketball team pushed their bus back on course Thursday after it was stuck in the snow outside a practice facility in Philadelphia. The Huskies were in the city to compete in the 2018 CAA Women's Basketball Tournament. The team posted a video of the feat on its Twitter account.

Steve Marchillo, a finance director at the University of Connecticut's Hartford branch, said he enjoyed the sight of heavily snow-laden trees on his way into work Thursday but they also made him nervous.

“It looks cool as long as they don't fall down on you and you don't lose power,” he said.

The Mount Snow ski area in Dover, Vermont, received 31 inches of snow by Thursday morning with more still falling. The resort said the snowfall from the past two storms would set it up for skiing through the middle of April.

Montville, New Jersey, got more than 26 inches from Wednesday's nor'easter. North Adams, Massachusetts, registered 24 inches, and Sloatsburg, New York, got 26 inches.

Major cities along the Interstate 95 corridor saw much less. Philadelphia International Airport recorded about 6 inches, while New York City's Central Park saw less than 3 inches.

The storm was not as severe as the nor'easter that toppled trees, flooded coastal communities and caused more than 2 million power outages from Virginia to Maine last Friday.

It still proved to be a headache for the tens of thousands of customers still in the dark from the earlier storm — and for the crews trying to restore power to them.

Massachusetts was hardest hit by outages, with more than 345,000 without service Thursday and Republican Gov. Charlie Baker closing all non-essential state offices. Republican Maine Gov. Paul LePage also closed state offices and encouraged residents to stay off roads “unless it is an absolute emergency.”

In New Jersey, the state's major utilities reported more than 247,000 customers without power a day after the storm.

In North White Plains, New York, 10 people were taken to hospitals with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning after running a generator inside a home, police said. All were expected to survive.

In Manchester Township, New Jersey, police said a teacher was struck by lightning while holding an umbrella on bus duty outside a school. The woman felt a tingling sensation but didn't lose consciousness. She was taken to a hospital with minor injuries.

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