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Xi reappointed as China's president with no term limits

| Friday, March 16, 2018, 11:09 p.m.
Delegates applaud as President Xi Jinping arrives for a plenary session of China's National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday, March 13, 2018. On Sunday, China's legislature scrapped a two-term limit on the presidency, paving the way for Xi to rule for as long as he wants.
Delegates applaud as President Xi Jinping arrives for a plenary session of China's National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on Tuesday, March 13, 2018. On Sunday, China's legislature scrapped a two-term limit on the presidency, paving the way for Xi to rule for as long as he wants.

BEIJING — Xi Jinping was reappointed Saturday as China's president with no limit on the number of terms he can serve.

The National People's Congress, China's rubber-stamp legislature, also appointed close Xi ally Wang Qishan to the formerly ceremonial post of vice president.

Xi, 64, is considered the most powerful Chinese leader since Mao Zedong and on Sunday was given the right to continue in office indefinitely after the legislature scrapped term limits for the president and vice president.

Chinese officials defended the move, saying it would bring the presidency in line with Xi's other two main positons of head of the ruling Communist Party and commander of the armed forces.

Critics say the move overturning a push to institutionalize China's ruling practices dating from 1982 will likely lead to increased political repression and possible infighting among party factions seeking to promote their own candidates within the closed system.

Xi took office as president in 2013 and hasn't said how many additional five-year terms he intends to serve. State media has said the removal of term limits will not alter conditions for retirement or create a president in perpetuity, but has offered no details.

Xi is expected to expand his yearslong campaign against corruption within the party to include all state employees through the creation of a new National Supervisory Commission, while continuing to pursue a muscular foreign policy and policies to upgrade the slowing economy.

Economic growth and social stability have allowed Xi to amend the constitution and carry out other moves that once seemed highly contentious, said Kerry Brown, professor of Chinese Studies and director of the Lau China Institute at King's College, London.

“Really no one is going to shout and moan too much” because growth and stability are considered so important, Brown said Friday in a talk to foreign media in Beijing.

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