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Republican subpoenas Justice Department for Clinton documents

| Thursday, March 22, 2018, 8:27 p.m.
In this Nov. 19, 2015, file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Robert Goodlatte, R-Va., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Goodlatte is subpoenaing the Justice Department as part of the panel’s ongoing probe into Democrat Hillary Clinton.
In this Nov. 19, 2015, file photo, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Rep. Robert Goodlatte, R-Va., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Goodlatte is subpoenaing the Justice Department as part of the panel’s ongoing probe into Democrat Hillary Clinton.

WASHINGTON — The Republican chairman of the House Judiciary Committee is subpoenaing documents from the Justice Department as part of the panel's probe into Democrat Hillary Clinton.

Rep. Robert Goodlatte of Virginia has demanded more than a million documents from the department as it examines the agency's 2016 investigation into Clinton's private email server. He is also demanding documents related to the firing of former deputy FBI Director Andrew McCabe, who was dismissed by Attorney General Jeff Sessions last week.

Sessions said he fired McCabe on the recommendation of FBI disciplinary officials who argued that McCabe had not been candid with a watchdog office investigation. An upcoming inspector general's report is expected to conclude that McCabe had authorized the release of information to the media and was not forthcoming with the watchdog office as it examined the bureau's handling of an investigation into Clinton's emails.

Goodlatte said he'd only received “a few thousand” of the 1.2 million documents he had requested in that investigation.

“Given the Department's ongoing delays in producing these documents, I am left with no choice but to issue the enclosed subpoena to compel production of these documents,” Goodlatte said in a letter to Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

Separately, Goodlatte is asking for documents related to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. Republicans have been critical of the department's use of the secret surveillance court authorized in that act and a warrant to monitor a former campaign adviser to President Donald Trump. Goodlatte said he had asked for those documents in February and had not received any.

In a statement responding to the subpoena, Justice Department spokesman Ian Prior said the department takes the request seriously and is “committed to accommodating” the request. Prior said that more than two dozen FBI staff have been working on producing the documents, and they are reviewing them for sensitive information.

“The original universe of documents requested was substantial, but there are approximately 30,000 documents thought to be responsive to the committee's inquiry,” said Prior. “Of that, we have thus far delivered 3,000 documents to the committee.”

The request for more information on Clinton comes on the same day that Republicans on the House intelligence committee shut down their investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election, concluding that Trump's campaign did not conspire with Russia.

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