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Storm causes havoc during New York City evening commute

| Tuesday, May 15, 2018, 8:06 p.m.
Commuters check for alternative ways home after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City. A powerful storm swept through the region just as the evening commute was kicking off after 5 p.m.
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Commuters check for alternative ways home after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City. A powerful storm swept through the region just as the evening commute was kicking off after 5 p.m.
Commuters wait for train service to be restored after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City.
Getty Images
Commuters wait for train service to be restored after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City.
NYPD officers stand watch as commuters wait for train service to be restored after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City.
Getty Images
NYPD officers stand watch as commuters wait for train service to be restored after a severe thunderstorm downed trees that caused power outages resulting in several Metro-North lines being suspended at Grand Central Terminal on May 15, 2018 in New York City.

NEW YORK — Thousands of riders were left stranded when a line of strong storms pushed across New York City and badly disrupted the evening commute.

Metro-North says the Hudson, New Haven and Harlem+ lines have resumed normal service after being suspended earlier because of downed trees on the tracks.

The commuter railroad says passengers should expect residual delays.

Pictures posted on social media showed concourses at the terminal jammed with stranded passengers.

The sky over the city turned black as the storm rolled in.

The three major airports serving the city were all experiencing flight delays of an hour or more.

In Connecticut, large swaths of the state are in the dark.

Over 130,000 customers are without power across the state. Eversource, the state's largest electric utility, is reporting 121,000 outages across the state Tuesday night. The United Illuminating Co., which serves the southwestern shoreline, was reporting nearly 9,901 customers without power.

Bradley International Airport says that flight operations are attempting to return to normal after it suspended flights, but there are a few delays. The National Weather Service had issued tornado warnings for Hartford, Litchfield, Fairfield, Middlesex, and New Haven counties, calling the storm "dangerous," and has since downgraded the warnings.

Connecticut State Police are warning drivers to use extra caution, given the potential for strong winds, downpours and reduced visibility.

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