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Collapsed building's owner held for questioning

| Monday, April 29, 2013, 9:57 p.m.

SAVAR, Bangladesh — A Bangladesh court on Monday gave police 15 days to interrogate the owner of a building that collapsed last week, killing at least 382 people, as rescuers used heavy machinery to cut through the destroyed structure after giving up hopes of finding any more survivors.

Mohammed Sohel Rana, who was arrested on Sunday as he tried to flee to India, will be held for questioning on charges of negligence, illegal construction and forcing workers to join work. His father, Abdul Khaleque, was arrested on suspicion of aiding Rana to force people to work in a dangerous building.

The illegally constructed, eight-story Rana Plaza collapsed in a heap on Wednesday morning as thousands of people worked inside in five garment factories. About 2,500 survivors have been accounted for.

Rana was brought to the Dhaka Metropolitan Magistrate's Court in a bullet-proof vest and led away to an unknown detention place after the magistrate granted a police request to hold him longer before filing formal charges. The crimes he is accused of carry a maximum punishment of seven years. More charges could be added later.

The collapse was the deadliest disaster to hit Bangladesh's garment industry, which is worth $20 billion annually and supplies global retailers.

In renewed anger against conditions in garment factories — a mainstay of Bangladesh's economy — hundreds of workers poured into the streets in the Dhaka suburb of Ashulia and set fire to an ambulance on Monday, the Independent TV network reported. They tried to set fire to a factory, it said. Authorities shut down all garment factories in the Ashulia and Gazipur industrial suburbs, including one that had reportedly developed cracks and was evacuated earlier.

Volunteers, army personnel and firefighters have worked around the clock since Wednesday, mostly using their hands and light equipment to pull out survivors. Authorities deployed hydraulic cranes and cutting machines to break up the enormous slabs of concrete into manageable pieces that could be lifted away.

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