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Sports

Rains play havoc with weekend action

| Friday, May 30, 2003

The only track to get any racing in last Friday was Lernerville, and that was just the heat races.

  • At Jennerstown Saturday, fans got to see two features before the rains came. The street stock winner was Dink Colaruso and the charger winner was Chantel Germek, her first in two starts this season. So once again, Jennerstown will try tomorrow night to get in two late model features, a 75-lap and a 50-lap with adult admission only $10!

  • It was an interesting field of late models at Latrobe Speedway Saturday. Mel Minnick, Jr. led for 21 laps before Doug Horton got by him for the eventual win. Veteran Lou Gentile was a close third, followed by Garry Sisson and Tony Raneri. The street stocks, chargers and micro sprints also had exciting mains. Tomorrow night the 410 sprints return along with the York E-Mod Triathalon Series. Street stocks and chargers will complete the program. No limited lates this week.

  • Roaring Knob has practice (gates open at noon) for all divisions tomorrow before their season opener June 7.

  • The PA Legacy series competes at Jennerstown this Saturday. George Stockman of Connellsville finished third last weekend behind Chris Brink and Brett Boyer.

  • Doug Bacciochi's son threw out the first ball at the Pirate game on Bob Prince Bobble Head Night.

  • Hunter Hill Kart Track in Mount Pleasant got all heats but one completed before the rains came. The annual Donny Wiltrout Memorial Race is tonight.

  • Some winners of interest last weekend include Gary Stuhler, at Cumberland, Scott Rhodes at Bedford, Donnie Moran at Muskingum and Twin 20 winners at PPMS were Lynn Geisler and Lou Bradich. Scott Bloomquist won $45,000 this weekend at the "Show Me 100" in Missouri and at Paducah in Kentucky.

  • Demo derbies are scheduled at both Lernerville and Motordrome tonight!

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