ShareThis Page
News

Staying active Susan Hrinko's key to longevity

| Saturday, March 21, 2009

She's 100 now, but there was a time when Ross Ridge Manor Personal Care Home resident Susan Hrinko liked to dance and drink beer.

Hrinko gave up both for good when she got married and raised her two daughters and a son. Now she spends her time drinking ginger ale and reading a good book.

"I made it and I drank it. I loved beer," Hrinko said. "When I was young, oh man did I dance. My feet were always moving."

"I had a good and interesting life," she said. "I came up the hard way but I enjoyed it."

Celebrating her 100th birthday Friday at the care home in Manor, Hrinko says she thinks the secret to her longevity was staying active. "I did a lot of walking," she said. "Walking kept me strong."

Hrinko said she got her foot stuck in a bucket at her home before she moved to Ross Ridge and fell down the stairs. "I never got hurt," she said.

She tripped getting the mail and didn't get hurt. "I never broke anything. I have strong bones," she said.

Caregivers at Ross Ridge Manor say Hrinko is always outside getting lots of fresh air or inside reading a book. She is the oldest resident of the care facility and takes the fewest of medications, they said.

"I still read a book 2 to 3 hours every day," Hrinko said. "I like good books, not junk. Books about real life."

Born in the Ukraine, at 4-years-old, Susan Rudek (shortened from Rudekevich) came with her family to the United States in 1913.

Hrinko lived in Ambridge all of her life, moving to Ross Ridge Manor to be near her daughter Marion who lives in Ford City.

One of her earliest and fondest memories was of getting her ration of butter during World War II.

"I would run down the hill to Isaly's for butter," Hrinko said. "Get my butter and go to work."

Her best memory is of her late husband John whom she was married to for 68 years.

"He proposed to me by saying 'I'm tired of eating in a restaurant, let's get married, and by the way, I love you.' That did it," she said. "He was one good man."

"I still like the old times better," she said.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me