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Friends of Hôpital Albert Schweitzer Haiti's art sale held at Ellis Armory

| Sunday, Sept. 11, 2011

It didn't take Dan Langfitt too long to put into perspective his feelings upon returning to the United States after spending a year living in Haiti as part of the agro-forestry project he is managing.

"The first hot shower is always a little bit of a shock," he confessed during the Friends of Hôpital Albert Schweitzer Haiti's art sale and exhibition held at the Ellis Armory on Friday.

FHAS prexy Lucy Rawson was joined by Jamini Vincent Davies, Tim and Audrey Fisher, Don Fischer, Mernie Berger, Lowrie Ebbert, Denise English and Kitty Hillman for H'art & Soul of Haiti, where there was also Dr. Ralph Greco, who was lauded for his four decades of volunteer medical care and material support to the Haitian community of the Artibonite.

"It really is an honor ... Haiti is a part of my life and always will be," he shared.

Meanwhile, as artifiles claimed dibs on their favorites and big Catering passed around trays of cuisine inspired by the Haitian marketplace, Cello Fury unleashed themselves on the unsuspecting crowd with a passion that nearly blew the paint off the walls.

"And they say the strings are boring," laughed one party-goer.

Photo Galleries

H'art & Soul of Haiti

H'art & Soul of Haiti

Friends of Hopital Albert Schweitzer Haiti's Art Sale and exhibition at the Ellis Armory on Friday, September 9, 2011.

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