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320,000 cribs recalled after four children get trapped

| Wednesday, June 25, 2008

WASHINGTON -- About 320,000 Jardine cribs sold by Toys "R" Us and Babies "R" Us stores were recalled Tuesday because four children became trapped.

The wooden slats and spindles on the crib frames can break, allowing children to get trapped in the remaining gap. The Consumer Product Safety Commission reported 42 incidents of broken slats and spindles. This includes four instances of children getting trapped, two of whom suffered cuts and bruises.

The recalled cribs were manufactured in China and Vietnam by Jardine Enterprises and sold by Toys "R" Us Inc. retailers: KidsWorld stores, Geoffrey stores, Toys "R" Us and Babies "R" Us. KidsWorld and Geoffrey stores are no longer in operation but sold the recalled cribs when they were open.

Earlier this year, Janine Nieman of East Stroudsburg, Pa., heard her son, Aiden, screaming first thing in the morning. She found him trapped with his body outside of the crib and his stuck head inside. One of the spindles had fallen out of the frame, and he had slid through the gap up to his head. Nieman and her husband, Thomas, slid Aiden back into the crib. He came out of the ordeal shaken but uninjured.

"Anything that impacts the safety of children is of real importance," said Nancy Nord, acting head of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. "This agency will not hesitate to recall products that are defective, and we take very, very seriously our responsibility to our youngest consumers: babies and toddlers."

Toys "R" Us spokeswoman Kathleen Waugh said the company removed all Jardine cribs from their selling floors several weeks ago, when it first became aware of multiple complaints about broken slats.

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