ShareThis Page
News

Penn Township policy aims to conserve salt

| Sunday, April 29, 2012, 3:52 p.m.

The higher price and uncertain availability of salt will bring a change in Penn Township winter road maintenance.

Commissioners unanimously adopted a policy Monday that calls for clearing only the center road surface of both lanes, with the exception of hills, curves and intersections.

"Everything will remain the same when treating of hills, intersections and curves," said Township Manager Bruce Light. "We're just not going to stretch to get that black road 100 percent clear on straight and narrow roads."

The township never had a policy on the books, but in the past would use enough salt to melt snow and ice to the pavement.

"We felt we might not have enough salt depending on the severity of the winter," said Charles Horvat, chairman of the board of commissioners. "We had no real policy, except for standard operating procedure. We can now pass it down to future commissioners as they come along. We also wanted to make sure we allow citizens to be aware and know what our policy is."

Light initially sent out invitations to five companies to submit bids for road salt, but four came back with no bid. The fifth -- International Salt Co. of Baltimore -- submitted a bid of $89 per ton and did not include delivery, requiring the township to pick up the salt in Baltimore.

The bid was unanimously rejected.

The township agreed to buy $2,500 tons from PennDOT at a cost of $51.90 per ton with the possibility of receiving an additional 1,000 tons. That would take the township's total tonnage to 5,500, including the amount in storage. That's usually enough for a typical winter.

A special meeting has been scheduled for 7 p.m. Monday to discuss the 2009 budget.

A preliminary budget was presented Nov. 12 that showed a shortfall of about $387,000. Commissioners are working to address that imbalance, and a preliminary spending plan might be approved Monday.

Light stressed to commissioners the importance of having a preliminary budget approved by Dec. 8 to enable it to be advertised for the required time before a final spending plan is approved by the end of the year.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me