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Woodland Hills lineman commits to UNC

| Saturday, July 29, 2006

Over the past 20 years, Woodland Hills has had 70 football players receive Division I-A scholarships. But on Friday, the program experienced a first.

"Coach (George) Novak said he didn't have a North Carolina helmet up on his wall," senior offensive lineman Mike Dykes said. "I get a chance to add one of them."

Dykes verbally committed to North Carolina yesterday and will formally announce his decision at a news conference at 11 a.m. Monday in the Woodland Hills gymnasium.

Dykes (6-foot-4, 275 pounds) was a first-team All-Quad East offensive tackle last season. He is projected to play guard.

Dykes is the second offensive lineman from Western Pennsylvania from the class of 2007 to commit to the Tar Heels, joining Cameron Holland of Perry.

Dykes turned down offers from Kentucky, Duke, Toledo, Temple, Miami (Ohio) and Ohio University.

The decision came two weeks after Dykes visited the campus while attending a 7-on-7 passing tournament at Wake Forest. On the trip, he also toured Duke, West Virginia and Virginia Tech.

"Mike just fell in love with North Carolina and the coaching staff," Novak said. "It was the perfect school for him."

As a sophomore, Dykes played on the defensive line before moving to offense in 2005. For the last three years, he has also played basketball. He was a three-sport athlete before dropping baseball last spring.

"He's an athlete -- a big athlete," Novak said. "He can run. He's very mobile."

Dykes has also excelled in the classroom, holding a 3.5 GPA. He plans to study business in college, preferably management or accounting.

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