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Major League Baseball today

| Saturday, May 24, 2008

STARS

Thursday

Andrew Miller , Marlins, gave up five hits in seven innings of a 4-0 victory over Arizona, completing a three-game sweep. Miller struck out nine with only one walk.

Tim Hudson , Braves, gave up a pair of homers on consecutive pitches in the second inning, then held the Mets scoreless through the next six innings to help Atlanta finish a four-game sweep with a 4-2 win.

Mike Lowell and J.D. Drew , Red Sox, connected for grand slams in an 11-8 win over the Royals. Lowell finished 3 for 4 with a double and scored three times. Drew scored twice.

Matt Joyce, Tigers, doubled and homered in three at-bats, driving in a pair of runs and scoring two more in a 9-2 rout of the Mariners.

Khalil Greene , Padres, homered twice in an 8-2 victory over Cincinnati.

SPEAKING

"I felt terrible. I mean, I think I know how hard it is to hit a home run in the major leagues. I had trouble sleeping after something like that."

-- Umpire Tim Welke, who ruled a ball hit by Alex Rodriguez on Wednesday night was in play even though replays showed it ricocheted off a cement staircase behind the outfield fence.

SEASONS

May 24

1918 -- Cleveland's Stan Coveleski pitched 19 innings in the Indians' 3-2 victory over the New York Yankees. Former pitcher Joe Wood hit a home run for the win.

1935 -- In the first major-league night game in Cincinnati, the Reds beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 2-1, before 25,000.

1936 -- Tony Lazzeri, batting eighth for the New York Yankees, drove in 11 runs with a triple and three home runs -- two of them grand slams -- in a 25-2 rout of the Philadelphia A's.

1964 -- Harmon Killebrew of the Minnesota Twins hit the longest home run in Baltimore's Memorial Stadium, a 471-foot shot to left-center off right-hander Milt Pappas.

1984 -- Jack Morris led the Tigers to their 17th straight road win, setting an AL record. Morris allowed four hits and Detroit beat the California Angels, 5-1.

1990 -- Chicago's Andre Dawson was walked intentionally five times by the Cincinnati Reds to break the record shared by Roger Maris and Garry Templeton.

1994 -- The St. Louis Cardinals set a major-league record by stranding 16 runners without scoring, losing to David West and three Philadelphia Phillies relievers, 4-0.

1995 -- Oakland's Dennis Eckersley became the sixth pitcher with 300 saves in a 5-2 win over the Baltimore Orioles.

1998 -- Freshman Matt Diaz hit four homers, tying a school and regional record, and drove in seven runs, as Florida State routed Oklahoma, 23-2, to advance to the NCAA Atlantic II Regional final.

2000 -- For the third time in major-league history a team blew a seven-run lead twice in a week. The Houston Astros lost a 7-0 lead at home against Philadelphia after blowing a 9-2 lead in the ninth inning at Milwaukee two days earlier.

2001 -- Jon Lieber of the Chicago Cubs threw a 79-pitch, one-hit shutout in a 3-0 blanking of the Reds. It was the first shutout of the Reds in an NL-record 208 games.

2006 -- Adam Wainwright homered in his first major-league at-bat and pitched three innings of relief to earn the win in St. Louis' 10-4 victory over San Francisco. Wainwright, who had no batting practice since spring training, hit the first pitch he saw out to left in the fifth for a solo homer.

2007 -- John Smoltz of Atlanta pitched seven shutout innings and became baseball's first pitcher with 200 wins and 150 saves with a 2-1 win over the New York Mets.

2007 -- Seattle's Ichiro Suzuki went 3 for 6 with a homer in his 1,000th major-league game. Suzuki compiled 1,414 hits in those games -- the second most by a player in his first 1,000 games since 1900. Hall of Famer Al Simmons (1924-44) had 1,443 hits in that span.

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