ShareThis Page
News

Maybe Maronda will start parade toward Mon Valley

| Tuesday, June 15, 2004

So it is true.

Good things do come to those who wait.

At least it seemed that way last week when ground was broken in Monessen for a complex that, when it opens later this year or early next year, will employ roughly 100 area residents.

It's been a long time since that kind of project came to Monessen -- a community still reeling from the economic sting caused by the decline of the domestic steel industry.

The deal that brought Maronda Homes Inc. of Pittsburgh to Monessen was put together largely by Doug Farnham of Belle Vernon-based Farnham and Pfile Inc. and state Rep. Ted Harai of Monessen.

Farnham's firm is contributing $7 million to $8 million to the development of a new home for Maronda's prefabricated house building business on property owned by the Westmoreland County Industrial Development Corp. in the city's Riverfont Industrial Park.

And Harhai secured a verbal commitment from Gov. Ed Rendell that the state will contribute another $5 million to the project.

Initially, Maronda will employ about 100 area residents at two manufacturing facilities that will cover some 240,000 square feet, according to project manager Jim Rey of General Industries.

But Farnham said expansion could create additional jobs and bring the development to about 500,000 square feet that would cover 29 acres.

Harhai said the Monessen location attracted Maronda because major highways are nearby and the construction site is near railroad lines and the Monongahela River.

Harhai said cooperation among city, county and state organizations in moving the project along was impressive.

"It's a happy day in Westmoreland County," Harhai said at the groundbreaking. "This is a long time coming. I'm extremely pleased. I'm just so proud of the fact that everyone pulled together to get this to where we are today."

We commend that spirit of cooperation and praise the result it achieved.

And we welcome Maronda to the Mid-Mon Valley and hope the firm's move to here proves so successful that other businesses looking for places to expand will follow its lead.

TribLIVE commenting policy

You are solely responsible for your comments and by using TribLive.com you agree to our Terms of Service.

We moderate comments. Our goal is to provide substantive commentary for a general readership. By screening submissions, we provide a space where readers can share intelligent and informed commentary that enhances the quality of our news and information.

While most comments will be posted if they are on-topic and not abusive, moderating decisions are subjective. We will make them as carefully and consistently as we can. Because of the volume of reader comments, we cannot review individual moderation decisions with readers.

We value thoughtful comments representing a range of views that make their point quickly and politely. We make an effort to protect discussions from repeated comments either by the same reader or different readers

We follow the same standards for taste as the daily newspaper. A few things we won't tolerate: personal attacks, obscenity, vulgarity, profanity (including expletives and letters followed by dashes), commercial promotion, impersonations, incoherence, proselytizing and SHOUTING. Don't include URLs to Web sites.

We do not edit comments. They are either approved or deleted. We reserve the right to edit a comment that is quoted or excerpted in an article. In this case, we may fix spelling and punctuation.

We welcome strong opinions and criticism of our work, but we don't want comments to become bogged down with discussions of our policies and we will moderate accordingly.

We appreciate it when readers and people quoted in articles or blog posts point out errors of fact or emphasis and will investigate all assertions. But these suggestions should be sent via e-mail. To avoid distracting other readers, we won't publish comments that suggest a correction. Instead, corrections will be made in a blog post or in an article.

click me