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In the loop: Tokyo seen from commuter train line | TribLIVE.com
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In the loop: Tokyo seen from commuter train line

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AP
In this Wednesday, May 22, 2019, photo, a man walk on the bridge as a Yamanote Line train departs from Ikebukuro Station in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives: jam-packed morning commute, views of the famous Shibuya crossing, high-rises, downtown shopping arcades, and a quick break at a noodle stand.
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AP
In this May 22, 2019, photo, a commuter is reflected in the window of a Yamanote Line train as he gets off at Shimbashi Station in Tokyo. Running above ground, views from wide windows on the train range from high-rises to local shopping arcade as the train covers different parts of the city. The line, according to company statistics, moves roughly 3 to 4 million people daily, more than the entire population of Jamaica.
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AP
In this Saturday, May 25, 2019, photo, a young man wearing a traditional kimono walks past a packed Yamanote Line train at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a man in a black suit waits for a train to arrive on a platform at Shinagawa Station in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a train conductor, right, gives a signal for departure in a Yamanote Line train in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a Yamanote Line train conductor sits in a control room as another Yamanote Line train approaches Ebisu Station in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives: jam-packed morning commute, views of the famous Shibuya crossing, high-rises, downtown shopping arcades, and a quick break at a noodle stand.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a woman wearing a kimono looks at a train route map while traveling in a Yamanote Line train in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives.
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AP
In this Tuesday, June 4, 2019, photo, a Yamanote Line train travels above commuters walking across the crossing during evening rush hours in the Shinjuku district of Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives.
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AP
In this Wednesday, May 22, 2019, photo, a Yamanote Line train departs from Ikebukuro Station in Tokyo. Operated by the East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line in Tokyo makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations that include key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily lives: jam-packed morning commute, views of the famous Shibuya crossing, high-rises, downtown shopping arcades, and a quick break at a noodle stand.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a group of commuters wearing black suits walk down the steps to catch a Yamanote Line train at Osaki Station in Tokyo. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Friday, May 24, 2019, photo, two commuters run up the steps to catch a Yamanote Line train at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo. Want to take a glimpse of daily life in downtown Tokyo? Take a ride on the Yamanote loop line. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, a man eats his breakfast in a noodle shop located on a platform between two Yamanote Line rails as a group of commuters wait in line to catch a train during morning rush hours at Shinagawa Station in Tokyo. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Wednesday, May 22, 2019, photo, a woman wearing a kimono stands next to a young woman wearing sneakers in a packed train traveling along the Yamanote Line in Tokyo. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Saturday, May 25, 2019, photo, commuters stand in a packed Yamanote Line train while waiting for the train to depart at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo. Want to take a glimpse of daily life in downtown Tokyo? Take a ride on the Yamanote loop line. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Saturday, May 25, 2019, photo, a commuter falls asleep on a platform as a Yamanote Line train departs in Tokyo. Want to take a glimpse of daily life in downtown Tokyo? Take a ride on the Yamanote loop line. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.
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AP
In this Friday, May 24, 2019, photo, commuters waiting for a train are seen through the window of a Yamanote Line train at Shimbashi Station in Tokyo. Running above ground, views from wide windows on the train range from high-rises to local shopping arcade as the train covers different parts of the city. The line, according to company statistics, moves roughly 3 to 4 million people daily, more than the entire population of Jamaica.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, commuters make their way past people waiting in line as they get off a Yamanote Line train during morning rush hours at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo. Trains are always packed during morning and evening rush hours as they are notoriously known. It’s so densely packed that passengers don’t even have to grab a handrail to stand upright despite swaying. There are shoves from commuters who can’t afford to wait another few minutes for a next train, but no one growls in irritation. It’s usually forgiven with just a little nod, a gesture of apology.
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AP
In this May 22, 2019, photo, a group of tourists are silhouetted in a Yamanote Line train as a Buddhist temple is seen through a window near Hamamatsucho Station in Tokyo. Running above ground, views from wide windows on the train range from high-rises to local shopping arcade as the train covers different parts of the city. The line, according to company statistics, moves roughly 3 to 4 million people daily _ more than the entire population of Jamaica.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, commuters stand in a packed Yamanote Line train at Shinjuku Station in Tokyo. Trains are always packed during morning and evening rush hours as they are notoriously known. It’s so densely packed that passengers don’t even have to grab a handrail to stand upright despite swaying. There are shoves from commuters who can’t afford to wait another few minutes for a next train, but no one growls in irritation. It’s usually forgiven with just a little nod, a gesture of apology.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, people wait in line to catch a Yamanote Line train in front of an advertisement for Japanese plum wine at Osaki Station in Tokyo. Running above ground, views from wide windows on the train range from high-rises to local shopping arcade as the train covers different parts of the city. The line, according to company statistics, moves roughly 3 to 4 million people daily, more than the entire population of Jamaica.
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AP
In this Tuesday, May 21, 2019, photo, a man reacts in a packed Yamanote Line train during evening rush hours in Tokyo. Want to take a glimpse of daily life in downtown Tokyo? Take a ride on the Yamanote loop line. For most Tokyoites, the line means an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the life of ordinary people living in the city.

TOKYO (AP) — Want a glimpse of daily life in downtown Tokyo? Take a ride on the Yamanote loop line.

For most Tokyoites, the line is an incredibly punctual and efficient transportation system for commuting. For tourists, it offers a glimpse into the lives of ordinary people in many of the city’s neighborhoods.

Operated by East Japan Railway Co., the Yamanote Line makes a loop around the center of the city, connecting 29 stations including key stops such as Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro. A complete loop of about an hour offers scenes of Japanese daily life: jam-packed commutes, views of the famous Shibuya crossing, local shopping arcades and stand-up noodle shops on train platforms.

Running above ground, the train offers clear views from its wide windows as it moves 3 million to 4 million people a day — about the same as the entire population of Connecticut.

Trains are so densely packed during morning and evening rush hours that passengers don’t need to hold onto a handrail to avoid falling. There are shoves from commuters who can’t wait three to four minutes for the next train, but no one growls in irritation. It’s typically forgiven with a little nod, a gesture of apology.

Morning commuters are quiet and are requested not to talk on cellphones, though there are ample announcements of station names, connecting train lines and safety precautions on the train. Fatigued office workers in business suits can catch up on their sleep, and travelers jet-legged from long flights can nap with peace of mind. If you miss your station, you will return 28 stations later, or you can get off at any stop and catch a train traveling around the loop in the opposite direction.

Eating on the train is not recommended. For a much better option, get off at Shinagawa Station and join other riders at a noodle shop right on the platform for an authentic bowl of soba or udon, all priced under 500 yen ($5). It’s Japan’s answer to fast food for busy passengers. Quick eaters may even be able to hop on the next train, but remember: no credit cards and no chairs are available.

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