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Books

Summertime is the perfect opportunity to dig into a good book

By Rege Behe
Books are boon companions any time of the year, but there’s something special about summer reading. The days are longer. Leisure time is more plentiful. It’s possible to sit for hours on end with a book on a beach, at ...

Doctor and author Oliver Sacks talks about what has kept him ‘On the Move’

By Jim Higgins
Hold on a minute: The young stud straddling the BMW motorcycle on the cover of “On the Move” is Oliver Sacks, the genial neurologist of ...

Review: Park’s ‘Re Jane’ explores life via ‘Jane Eyre’

By Connie Ogle
In her delightful debut novel, Patricia Park uses the classic novel “Jane Eyre” as a template to examine very modern concepts: questions of identity and ...

Review: In new Spenser thriller: Kids are OK, judges aren’t

By Kendal Weaver
When a teenager’s innocent social-media prank turns into a punishing trip behind bars, Boston private eye Spenser begins a probe that stretches from freezing, blustery New England all the way to a sunny Florida marina. Along the way, he gets ...

Review: ‘How to Survive Anything’ is a laugh-filled, but somewhat serious, guide

By Ron Charles
If you’ve made it this far, you already know it’s a dangerous world out there. Ebola, terrorism, Twitter trolls — every day is a battle ...

Point Breeze writer draws from his past

By Rege Behe
For his first novel, Nick Courage wanted to write a literary young-adult novel akin to Jean Craighead George’s “My Side of the Mountain,” a 1959 ...

Kahn biography looks beyond laughs

By Douglass K. Daniel
She was delightful in “Paper Moon” and “Blazing Saddles,” then uproarious as the monster’s tuneful bride in “Young Frankenstein.” Yet, Madeline Kahn often didn’t seem ...

Review: John Lescroart’s ‘The Fall’ is tantalizing legal thriller

By Jeff Ayers
John Lescroart has written a terrific courtroom mystery as the main series characters take a back seat to defense attorney Rebecca Hardy, daughter of regular ...

Review: Willie Nelson’s ‘It’s a Long Story’ may not tell enough

By Preston Jones
With dozens of books already authored about the life and music of one Willie Hugh Nelson, is another tome truly necessary? Nelson himself has already had ...

Bethel Park writer Kobus lives and breathes Pittsburgh’s steel industry

By Rege Behe
Ken Kobus grew up seven blocks away from the Jones & Laughlin Pittsburgh Works on the South Side. His father and grandfather were steelworkers, and ...

Monroeville author to recount his journey from ‘Ice’ to ‘Fire’ in McKeesport

By Carol Waterloo Frazier
What started as a study of the public’s lack of faith in elected officials ended in giving James John Lomeo a better understanding of his ...

Review: ‘In Montmartre’ provides a colorful account of the birth of modern art in Paris

By Ann Levin
At the dawn of the 20th century, the Parisian district of Montmartre was still largely rural, a hillside village dotted with windmills, vineyards and tumbledown shacks. There, a ragtag band of young artists, many of them foreigners, gravitated to ...

Review: Art of deception drives woman’s search for self in ‘Unbecoming’

By Cindy Bagwell
In a basement salon in suburban Paris, a young American woman mends precious antiques, making repairs so subtle you can’t tell the teapot was ever cracked. She also can switch the precious stones in your great-aunt’s brooch for paste, without dimming ...

Review: Attica Locke’s ‘Pleasantville’ has gripping, believable plot

By Oline H. Cogdill
The compelling “Pleasantville” continues Attica Locke’s insightful look at African-American life in Houston, where politics, race and classism converge in myriad ways. Locke sets her third novel in Pleasantville, a Houston neighborhood that was built after World War II specifically ...

Review: Mariel Hemingway makes sense of her family’s troubles in ‘Out Came the Sun’

By Will Lester
Born into one of America’s best-known families, Mariel Hemingway grew up with the advantages of sharing the name of her grandfather Ernest Hemingway and the burden of growing up in a family at least as dysfunctional as it was famous. ...

Author Cready’s latest brings time-travel romance to Pittsburgh streets

By Rege Behe
Dressing fictional characters in appropriate period costumes seems to be contingent on thorough research. But Gwyn Cready’s dilemma is a bit more problematic given that ...

New McCullough book celebrates Wright Brothers

By The Associated Press
David McCullough’s latest work of history followed a spontaneous path, from a book about many Americans in Paris in the 20th century to the biography ...

Review: Documentary filmakers’ memoir gives backstage peek at stars

By Douglass K. Daniel
It sounds so easy in the age of YouTube and Meerkat. Just put a camera in front of a couple of people and cue them ...

Review: Gorgeous writing gives power to flat, rushed novel ‘The Children’s Crusade’

By Kim Curtis
Ann Packer’s new novel tells the story of a family set against the stunning landscape of pre-Silicon Valley Northern California. Pediatrician Bill falls in love ...

Review: In sparkling ‘The Turner House,’ no escape from haunted Detroit

By Mike Fischer
In the opening pages of “The Turner House” — Angela Flournoy’s wonderful debut novel about an African-American family with 13 children set in 2008 Detroit ...